Allah= Al+ilah ?

Prove Islam is from God, why it is the 'One True Religion'.
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The Cat
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Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 3:23 pm

Re: Allah= Al+ilah ?

Post by The Cat »

AhmedBahgat wrote:The Arabic word Al-Ilah is a proper word, therefore the name Allah cannot be the combination of Al+Ilah
Al-Ilah was NEVER meant to mean a proper name and its root came -millenias- before Muhammad. It comes, I repeat, from the well know
Akkadian IL/ILU/ILANU, all diminutives related to Enlil as 'The God'. In all pre-Islamic Nabataean inscriptions Allah was written 'L' or 'LH.'

Qaus is Allah
Image
A horned stele dedicated to Kaus-allah, 'Kaus is Allah' or 'Qos the god', by Kaus-Malaka reigned around 750BC was found near Petra
(Glueck 516). Qos is identifiable with Kaush (Qaush) the God of the older Edomites.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaus" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Kaus was the national god of the Edomites. He was also known as Qaush, Kaush, Qaus, Qos and Kos. He was probably a mountain god
and may be connected with the Nabataean deity Dusharres. The name of the deity was used as the theophoric element in the names
of the Edomite kings Kaus-gabri and Kaus-malaka (by 750BC).
By stating that Allah is a proper name you make Him into a tribal idol, just like the Edomite Kaus. Congratulation!
Your 'Allah' runs counter to any 'Tawhid' notion of Oneness, becoming limited in essence like just any other divinity.

It tramples the first and last rampart of Islam. I readily could go for that. Again, congratulations!
Authority has the same etymological root as authenticity.

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KufirbintKufr
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Re: Allah= Al+ilah ?

Post by KufirbintKufr »

Here are more quotes on Allah by three diferent people:
It seems unlikely that the name Allah comes from al-ilaah "the God", but rather from the Aramaic/Syriac alaha, meaning 'God' or 'the God'. The final 'a' in the name alaha was originally the definite article 'the' and is regularly dropped when Syriac words and names are borrowed into Arabic. Middle-eastern Christianity used 'alah' and 'alaha' frequently, and it would have often been heard.

But in the Aramaic/Syriac language there are two different 'a' vowels, one rather like the 'a' in English 'hat' and the other more like the vowel in 'ought'. In the case of 'alah', the first vowel was like 'hat' and the second like 'ought'. Arabic does not have a vowel like the one in 'ought', but it seems to have BORROWED this vowel along with the word 'alah'. If you know Arabic, then you know that the second vowel in 'allah' is unique; it occurs only in that one word in Arabic.
The etymological derivation of "Allah" as a contraction of "al-ilah", which was maintained in numerous contributions to sri, too, is "popular" etymology and surely not historic. It would be rather strange that especially the "i" should have been disappeared due to neglect of the speakers, since the syllable "il" is the most important in "al-ilah": "il" or "el" is the semitic word for God since times immemorial.

Instead, the word "Allah", as a lot of other words, especially words of the religious sphere, was imported from the Syriac (Aramaic) language: "alaha" - with three long a-vowels -, is the Aramaic word for the (Christian) unique God. The last (long) "a" characterizes the status absolutus in the Aramaic language and was duly omitted by the Arabs like case endings in the Arabic vernacular, whereas the understanding of the first syllable of "alaha" as an article was a common misunderstanding like for instance in "al-Iskandar" from Greek "Alexandros" etc. The doubling of the "l" is irrelevant, since the doubling sign is a very late invention of Arabic orthography, centuries after Muhammad.
Someone also claims that:
According to the general principle of making proper nouns from common nouns in the Arabic language, the word ilah (common noun) has been converted to al-ilah, which became Allah due to the turgidity and the slight difficulty of pronunciation of the word al-ilah.
So why is al-ilah still used ?

Anyway,

There is also article written by convert Abu Iman Robert Squires :
I would like to strongly concur with your observations about the use of the word "Allah" in English and any other language. Both from my conversion experience in America and my experience doing da'wah here in Kuwait, it is definitely 100% - without a shadow of a doubt - better to use the word "God" when making da'wah to English speaking people.

This alone is enough to open many hearts and minds since many people think that Muslims worship a different God. I've come across some Arab brothers who insist in using only the word "Allah". They somehow think that it implies Tawhid while the word "God" implies the Trinity, etc., etc.
You know, the problem with such people is not their knowledge of Arabic,(...)

The mentality of some of these brothers almost approaches that of the Bani Isra'il - the "our God vs. your God" mentality! By the way, I've never met an English-speaking convert to Islam (or Spanish-speaking, or French-speaking) who disagreed with me on this point. Most them went through a stage wondering why (some) Muslims insist on using Allah.
http://www.submission.org/allah-god.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

He never met a non Arabic speaking person who disagrees with him...Amazing... :roflmao:
Maybe they do insist because they know Arabic ?
Galatians 1:7-8
But there are some who trouble (agitate) you, and they would pervert the good news of Christ.
If we or an angel from heaven should preach to you any message other than that which we preached to you, let him be accursed.

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The Cat
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Re: Allah= Al+ilah ?

Post by The Cat »

KufirbintKufr wrote:Someone also claims that:
According to the general principle of making proper nouns from common nouns in the Arabic language, the word ilah (common noun) has been converted to al-ilah, which became Allah due to the turgidity and the slight difficulty of pronunciation of the word al-ilah.
WRONG: this is THE CONCLUSIVE part at the end of the article. Strangely I've quoted the same article right here:
viewtopic.php?p=96321#p96321" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

You also forgot to finish the sentence you've highlighted: ''You know, the problem with such people is not their knowledge of Arabic,
but their ignorance of English.. (then he completed his idea): unlike the word "god" in English, which ALWAYS implies a false god.
Non-native English speakers sometimes mistakenly believe that "god" and "God" are the same English word, but they are not.
They carry completely different meanings. If they doubt this, then they simply don't know how to speak the English language.
And to say that the word "Allah" can only be used for the Supreme Almighty Creator is refuted by the Quran itself...
.

And finishing the author's second line you've emphasized while cutting: ... ''Most them went through a stage wondering why (some) Muslims
insist on using Allah. I should also add that I know a lot of Muslims that use "God" when speaking English. I find this rather common
among most Egyptians that I know. In Morocco, where I visit quite frequently, the also use Dieu when they parlez francais.''

KufirbintKufr wrote:Maybe they do insist because they know Arabic ?
Your whole expose was an exercise in pettiness. Especially from someone not speaking Arabic himself, yet rather relying on
testimonies fitting his preconceptions than etymological dictionaries and scholarly sources. Someone who believes that any
Arabic native would of necessity knows etymological complexities, while the very article he brought proved... otherwise!
It is surprising to notice that most of these Muslim brothers and/or sisters do not know that the word "Allah" is the Arabic word for the word "God". Many of them believe that "Allah" is the name of the Muslim God. They do not realize that the word "Allah" does not belong exclusively to the Muslims and that it has always been used before (and after) Islam by the Arabic-speaking Jews and Christians when they speak about God.

Talking to English speaking people about God using the word "Allah" is very much the same like speaking to Arabic speaking people about "Allah" using the word God. (...) Insisting on the use of the word "Allah" which is the Arabic word for God immediately creates the illusion that "Allah" is a whole different deity than God of the whole world. It creates a god that belongs ONLY to the Muslims, and takes the universality of Islam out of it.
According to your logic, since you're fluent in English, you must already know the strongest etymology for 'God'.
So: is it Gothic, Germanic, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Greco-Roman... or going way back into IE languages family?
Image
Graphic: http://www.danshort.com/ie/timeline.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Authority has the same etymological root as authenticity.

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