Is The Cat here? I have a question on Syriac and Nabatean

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Marie
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Is The Cat here? I have a question on Syriac and Nabatean

Post by Marie »

I'm writing article on the possibility of the Quran not written entirely on Arabic and I have a few questions.

Are Syriac and Nabatean related to each other? Is there a possibility the Quran could have been partially written in Nabatean?

If anyone else has any information your input would be greatly appreciated.

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The Cat
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Re: Is The Cat here? I have a question on Syriac and Nabatean

Post by The Cat »

Marie wrote:I'm writing article on the possibility of the Quran not written entirely on Arabic and I have a few questions.

Are Syriac and Nabatean related to each other? Is there a possibility the Quran could have been partially written in Nabatean?
This is a most comprehensive linguistic map showing how Nabatean and Syriac share a common Aramaic ground.
It shows how Nabatean gave rise to the Central Arabic, yet different from the much older Arabic found in Ethiopia
Image

That the Koranic Arabic used the Nabatean's 22 phonemes instead of the 28 Musnab (the Sabaic Script) tells a lot... !
It says that the Arabic Koran didn't originate in Mecca, or any southern part of Arabia but much, much further North.

http://www.free-minds.org/language" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.free-minds.org/ayman" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
While the Musnad script became extinct shortly after the Islamic era, the Nabataean script became the Arabic script that we are all familiar with today. The following map shows the location of Old Arabic inscriptions in the Nabataean script (in red) and Musnad script (in green).
Image
In northern Arabia, southern Syria and southwestern Iraq, up to the fourth century AD, Aramaic was the language of prestige. Thus, we find that the important religious texts were in Aramaic. The distribution in the north of the Peninsula of Old Arabic texts suggests that speakers of the Old Arabic dialect were present throughout the areas where Aramaic had come to be the prestige language. It was therefore natural that when Old Arabic came to be written in these regions, the Nabataean Aramaic script was the chosen vehicle. However, unlike the Ancient South Arabian Musnad script, the late Nabataean script only had twenty-two letters to represent the twenty-eight phonemes of Arabic and thus was largely inadequate for the expression of Arabic. For example, the "B" and "T" are indistinguishable and so are the "Kh", "Ha", and "J" and the "Z" and "R".

Moreover, letters such as the "B", "Y", and "N" are indistinguishable in the initial and medial positions. Thus, dotting was sometimes used to resolve ambiguities. Despite those major inadequacies, the prestige of the Nabataean Aramaic script outweighed other considerations.[1 While the script of prestige in Northern Arabia was the Nabataean script, the script of prestige in Central Arabia and South Arabia was the Musnad script. Thus, in the Central Arabian town of Qaryat Al-Faw we find that Arabic inscriptions (see example below) were written using the Ancient South Arabian script. We also see the same phenomenon is the South at places such as Najran and Haram.

So the orthography of the great reading negates a central Arabian origin. In central and south Arabia, the Sabaic script remained the prestige script until the Islamic era when it was displaced by the Nabataean Aramaic script. In the Roman affiliated Ghassanid provinces of northern Arabia, Greek increasingly became the prestige language of politics and religion starting around the mid fourth century CE and thus took over as the prestige religious script. This is confirmed by two pre-quranic leaves of parchment bearing a part of the Septuagint text of Psalm 78 (LXX, 77) with an Arabic explanation written in Greek script[2]. On the other hand, in southwestern Iraq and the border areas of Northern Arabia, the Lakhmid provinces continued to use Nabataean Aramaic as the script of prestige for writing Arabic. (...)

"jund": army/soldiers (36:28, 36:75, 38:11, 44:24, 67:20, 19:75, 37:173, 48:4, etc.). Unlike the great reading, pre-quranic inscriptions in the Musnad script use the South Arabian word "jaysh" not "jund" for army/soldiers. Given that the Lakhmids had military alliances with the Persians, this is consistent with the great reading being revealed in a Lakhmid province or border town where Persian influence on the local Arabic dialect in the domain of military lingo would be stronger than central/south Arabian influence.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_language" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of ... scriptions" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Oldest proto-Arabic Inscription, that of Zebed (near Aleppo, Syria) dated 512AD. Trilingual with 6 words (including Al-Ilah -Allah) in Arabic:
With the help of God (الاله)! Sergius, son of Amat Manaf, and Tobi, son of Imru'l-qais and Sergius, son of Sa‘d, and Sitr, and Shouraih.

http://www.islamic-awareness.org/Histor ... criptions/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.islamic-awareness.org/Histor ... avdat.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.islamic-awareness.org/Histor ... zebed.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Apart from the Zebed Inscription, the two oldest are the Jabal Usays' (dated 528)
and the Harran's (568), both of which where found still in Syria, near Damascus.
Image

In: Where Was Muhammad, if not in Mecca?
viewtopic.php?p=93188#p93188" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Mashq (Medina) script, attested: 725. Surahs Ya-Sin (36), 72-83 and Al-Saffat, 1-14.
No aya markers and no surah headings.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ma%27il" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; (Ma'il or Hijazi script, from Hejaz -West coast of Arabia).

Hijazi, Masq, Kufic and Ma'il scripts.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ma%27il" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
http://www.schoyencollection.com/arabic.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Earliest Arabic scripts
Omayyad kufic script: MS 2400 Mesopotamia, 661-750

Mashq script: MS 4597 North Africa or Near East, ca. 750-800

A study of mine on the Syrio-Aramaic origin of the Koran (in the old forum):
Was the Qur'an Originally in Arabic? (with comments)
http://www.faithfreedom.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=39753" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Fuller in Resource Center: Was the Qur'an First in Arabic?
http://www.faithfreedom.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=39999" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Hundred or so of referencial links (see generalities).
http://www.faithfreedom.org/forum/viewt ... 918#898918" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

:reading: :library:
Authority has the same etymological root as authenticity.

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Marie
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Re: Is The Cat here? I have a question on Syriac and Nabatean

Post by Marie »

Thanks. I will look at the links when I get a chance. If I come up with more questions I will either post them here or pm you.

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Ibn Rushd
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Re: Is The Cat here? I have a question on Syriac and Nabatean

Post by Ibn Rushd »

Check also Quran Misinterpreted by Gabriel Sawma. You can read the first pages on Amazon.com. He discusses the impact of Syriac.
There is no Master but the Master, and QT-1 is his Prophet.

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