Wind turbines

For topics which do not fit into any of the other categories.
Post Reply
User avatar
Ariel
Posts: 7748
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 1:34 am
Location: The Netherlands

Wind turbines

Post by Ariel »

How awful :cry:
Image

How much of Scotland’s scenic beauty should be sacrificed for developments?

Is it worth wider mobile phone coverage for rural areas? Forests of wind turbines providing green energy? New roads giving better access to remote communities?

Saying yes to any of these projects inevitably means sacrificing an area of natural landscape.

The question is – is that a price we are willing to pay for progress?

In recent weeks The Sunday Post has looked at the issue of developments that affect Scotland’s landscape, from controversial Scottish Government proposals on mobile phone masts to the rapid expansion of wind farms.

Add to that the electricity pylons and roads that continue to pop up in the countryside and it’s no wonder critics have raised concerns that Scotland’s most picturesque, tranquil and beautiful spots are being irreversibly marred by eyesores, all in the name of progress.

We need to value our country’s natural landscapes

Scots are becoming quite canny at spotting the difference between well-planned, sensitively-sited developments and those designed merely to put money into the pockets of shareholders.

For example, while most people probably think the Dundee Michelin factory’s turbines are interesting landmarks, many campaigners are genuinely concerned about the encircling effect of large wind developments around the Cairngorms National Park.

The John Muir Trust found that 800 industrial-height turbines were either built, consented to or going through the planning process in the National Park area.

If approved, there would potentially be three million tonnes of reinforced concrete buried in the bases – and that is expected to be left in the ground.

Sadly, planning authorities do not always properly consider the environmental evidence or recognise the genuine concerns of rural communities.

Surveys show the visual impact from pylon lines and hill tracks is particularly disliked. We need to make sure each development is justified and sensitively constructed.

The John Muir Trust, as a wild land conservation body, is particularly concerned about industrial wind developments which impact on wild landscapes – one of Scotland’s most loved features.

Although the Scottish Government brought in a welcome measure of protection with mapping and planning policy for wild land areas, there are still a number of major applications coming forward.

Residents and businesses in these communities are very dependent on tourism and share our concerns about the impact of poorly-planned industrial developments.

Their fears are about the degradation of our natural landscapes.

In a recent Mountaineering Scotland survey of members, 67% stated they preferred not to see wind farms when in the mountains.

Also, 22% said they avoided areas with wind farms when planning their activities.

Public money should be directed
away from industrial developments towards genuinely community-scale projects.

More support should be given to research and development into more advanced renewable technologies, such as tidal energy.

Scots are very proud of our natural landscapes – let’s value them.
Image
Whitelee, the UK’s largest on-shore windfarm (Aerial Photography Solutions)
The heart of the wise inclines to the right,
but the heart of the fool to the left.

User avatar
Ariel
Posts: 7748
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 1:34 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Wind turbines

Post by Ariel »

When you drive through Germany the first thing you notice are the many windmills.
Windmills. As far as the eyes can see. On flat land, on hills. You can't escape the ugly sight of those costly, Ineffective windmills
Image
Political Storm Erupts: Hostile Germans Turn on Ugly, Costly & Ineffective Wind Power

Held up as the wind cult’s poster girl, Germany went hard and fast, spearing tens of thousands of these things all over its, once cherished and pristine, landscape.

The cost of its maniacal rush into massively subsidised wind and solar to German businesses and households has been astronomical and, in the mother of all ironies, CO2 emissions continue to rise.

The German populace has, since 1945, been collectively reticent to cause trouble or resist whatever policy their political masters deem to be in Germany’s best interests. The German form of passive acceptance goes a long way to explain the Energiewende: a trillion euro business, family and environment destroying policy disaster.

However, even German goodwill has its natural limits.

The rural population is furious: howling about the cost of power, the environmental destruction and the incessant turbine generated low-frequency noise and infrasound that wrecks their ability to sleep, live in and otherwise enjoy their homes.

And signalling just how far reaching the German’s backlash against wind power is, Fritz Vahrenholt, a man instrumental in the creation of the environmental movement in Germany and the Chairman of the German Wildlife Trust has joined his angry compatriots and started railing against the destruction and havoc caused by wind power.

Meanwhile in Switzerland – where policy makers are keen to follow Germany’s ‘green’ energy debacle – major employers such as pharmaceutical, chemical and biotech companies are furious that they are being lined up for the same rocketing power costs and chaotic supply suffered by their German neighbours.

Germany: 120 Billion Euros For 5% Electricity Supply! And “Huge New Green Movement” Against Wind Power

The Swiss online Baseler Zeitung here writes how the country’s Association for Pharmaceutical, Chemical and Biotech Companies is coming out against Switzerland’s recently proposed green “energy strategy”, saying that it is “fundamentally going in the wrong direction”.

The association fears it will lead to higher costs.

Energy politician Christian Wasserfallen “is pleased” about the message, the Baseler Zeitung writes.

“The economy is slowly realizing what a threat the energy strategy poses.”
The heart of the wise inclines to the right,
but the heart of the fool to the left.

User avatar
Ariel
Posts: 7748
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 1:34 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Windmills

Post by Ariel »

Dutch windmills from the 21st century. :( Thank you green fouls.

Image
The heart of the wise inclines to the right,
but the heart of the fool to the left.

User avatar
Fernando
Posts: 4949
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2012 1:27 pm

Re: Wind power

Post by Fernando »

Ariel wrote:
“Huge New Green Movement” Against Wind Power
Oh, the irony!
‘Hindus and Muslims belong to two different religious philosophies, social customs and literary traditions. They neither intermarry nor eat together, and indeed they belong to two different civilisations which are based mainly on conflicting ideas and conceptions.’ Muhammad Ali Jinnah

User avatar
Ariel
Posts: 7748
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 1:34 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Wind power

Post by Ariel »

ISLE OF MAN SEABIRD POPULATIONS PLUMMET AS WIND FARMS OVERWHELM THE IRISH SEA

Herring Gulls are down 82%, European Shag down 51%, Razorbills down 55%. The list goes on… * The world’s biggest offshore wind farm is just a few miles away. * Isn’t there a conspicuous connection?
Image
The Isle Of Man wildlife charity Manx Birdlife has reported a shocking 40% decline in the populations of many species of sea birds around the island’s coast.

The worrying figures emerged following a comprehensive census that took place over two years. Whatever the reason for the sharp decline of the birds, it illustrates that something has gone very wrong.

I’ve noted with interest that this unprecedented drop in populations, of several of the island’s maritime species, coincides with the proliferation of wind farms in the Irish Sea – something which has worried me during the past few years, as I have witnessed the frenzied development of the wind industry in the waters off the western coasts of England and Wales.

World’s Biggest Offshore Wind Farm just a few miles away….

We know that offshore turbines kill birds and bats, though it is almost impossible to estimate the number of casualties because there are no retrievable carcasses to count at sea….

It is also highly likely that wind farms adversely affect many marine mammals.

The world’s largest offshore wind farm is now in operation off the Cumbrian coast at Walney, just 40 miles or so from the Isle of Man, and, with the news that nearby bird populations are in free-fall, we must seriously ask whether the huge turbines might be killing more birds than we ever anticipated.

The Isle of Man study was, ironically, partly supported by the Walney Extension Offshore Wind Farm Project. How paradoxical would it be to find that the project itself, with its giant 640 feet turbines, was responsible for the plummeting numbers of sea birds.

The report is full of depressing statistics. Herring Gulls are down 82%, European Shag down 51%, Razorbills down 55%. The list goes on.

Marine Protected Areas “may not necessarily be major barrier to new projects…”

I’ve been increasingly concerned at the feverish pace of industrial offshore wind farm development in this country and especially in the Irish Sea. Such a high density of turbines in a confined area – an area renowned for its wildlife – has been watched with dismay by many environmentalists, especially since large parts of the sea have been designatedMarine Protected Areas (MPA’s), supposedly limiting the scale of industrial development in precious areas that provide important habitat for so many species.

Alas, development has been allowed in vast parts of the sea that fall just outside the protected zones – and there have even been hints that the MPA’s themselves may not be off limit for future wind farm expansion. Last year, a report carried out for the Welsh government suggested that “this protection may not necessarily be a major barrier to new projects” – which sounds shockingly irresponsible to me.
Look at this picture. This bird is still alive and one of his wings is chopped off. Look at the despair in his eyes.

I can't put this picture out of my mind. I hate windmills. :(

Image
The heart of the wise inclines to the right,
but the heart of the fool to the left.

User avatar
Ariel
Posts: 7748
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 2009 1:34 am
Location: The Netherlands

Re: Wind power

Post by Ariel »

Wind Turbine Blades Can’t Be Recycled, So They’re Piling Up in Landfills

Companies are searching for ways to deal with the tens of thousands of blades that have reached the end of their lives.

Image

A wind turbine’s blades can be longer than a Boeing 747 wing, so at the end of their lifespan they can’t just be hauled away. First, you need to saw through the lissome fiberglass using a diamond-encrusted industrial saw to create three pieces small enough to be strapped to a tractor-trailer.

The municipal landfill in Casper, Wyoming, is the final resting place of 870 blades whose days making renewable energy have come to end. The severed fragments look like bleached whale bones nestled against one another.

“That’s the end of it for this winter,” said waste technician Michael Bratvold, watching a bulldozer bury them forever in sand. “We’ll get the rest when the weather breaks this spring.”

Tens of thousands of aging blades are coming down from steel towers around the world and most have nowhere to go but landfills. In the U.S. alone, about 8,000 will be removed in each of the next four years. Europe, which has been dealing with the problem longer, has about 3,800 coming down annually through at least 2022, according to BloombergNEF. It’s going to get worse: Most were built more than a decade ago, when installations were less than a fifth of what they are now.

Built to withstand hurricane-force winds, the blades can’t easily be crushed, recycled or repurposed. That’s created an urgent search for alternatives in places that lack wide-open prairies. In the U.S., they go to the handful of landfills that accept them, in Lake Mills, Iowa; Sioux Falls, South Dakota; and Casper, where they will be interred in stacks that reach 30 feet under.

“The wind turbine blade will be there, ultimately, forever,” said Bob Cappadona, chief operating officer for the North American unit of Paris-based Veolia Environnement SA, which is searching for better ways to deal with the massive waste. “Most landfills are considered a dry tomb.”

“The last thing we want to do is create even more environmental challenges.”

To prevent catastrophic climate change caused by burning fossil fuels, many governments and corporations have pledged to use only clean energy by 2050. Wind energy is one of the cheapest ways to reach that goal.

The electricity comes from turbines that spin generators. Modern models emerged after the 1973 Arab oil embargo, when shortages compelled western governments to find alternatives to fossil fuels. The first wind farm in the U.S. was installed in New Hampshire in 1980, and California deployed thousands of turbines east of San Francisco across the Altamont Pass.

The first models were expensive and inefficient, spinning fast and low. After 1992, when Congress passed a tax credit, manufacturers invested in taller and more powerful designs. Their steel tubes rose 260 feet and sported swooping fiberglass blades. A decade later, General Electric Co. made its 1.5 megawatt model—enough to supply 1,200 homes in a stiff breeze—an industry standard.

Wind power is carbon-free and about 85% of turbine components, including steel, copper wire, electronics and gearing can be recycled or reused. But the fiberglass blades remain difficult to dispose of. With some as long as a football field, big rigs can only carry one at a time, making transportation costs prohibitive for long-distance hauls. Scientists are trying to find better ways to separate resins from fibers or to give small chunks new life as pellets or boards.

In the European Union, which strictly regulates material that can go into landfills, some blades are burned in kilns that create cement or in power plants. But their energy content is weak and uneven and the burning fiberglass emits pollutants.

In a pilot project last year, Veolia tried grinding them to dust, looking for chemicals to extract. “We came up with some crazy ideas,” Cappadona said. “We want to make it a sustainable business. There’s a lot of interest in this.”

One start-up, Global Fiberglass Solutions, developed a method to break down blades and press them into pellets and fiber boards to be used for flooring and walls. The company started producing samples at a plant in Sweetwater, Texas, near the continent’s largest concentration of wind farms. It plans another operation in Iowa.

“We can process 99.9% of a blade and handle about 6,000 to 7,000 blades a year per plant,” said Chief Executive Officer Don Lilly. The company has accumulated an inventory of about one year’s worth of blades ready to be chopped up and recycled as demand increases, he said. “When we start to sell to more builders, we can take in a lot more of them. We’re just gearing up.”

Until then, municipal and commercial dumps will take most of the waste, which the American Wind Energy Association in Washington says is safest and cheapest.

“Wind turbine blades at the end of their operational life are landfill-safe, unlike the waste from some other energy sources, and represent a small fraction of overall U.S. municipal solid waste,” according to an emailed statement from the group. It pointed to an Electric Power Research Institute study that estimates all blade waste through 2050 would equal roughly .015% of all the municipal solid waste going to landfills in 2015 alone.

In Iowa, Waste Management Inc. “worked closely with renewable energy companies to come up with a solution for wind mill blade processing, recycling and disposal,” said Julie Ketchum, a spokeswoman. The largest U.S. trash hauler gets as many as 10 trucks per day at its Lake Mills landfill.

Back in Wyoming, in the shadow of a snow-capped mountain, lies Casper, where wind farms represent both the possibilities and pitfalls of the shift from fossil fuels. The boom-bust oil town was founded at the turn of the 19th century. On the south side, bars that double as liquor stores welcome cigarette smokers and day drinkers. Up a gentle northern slope, a shooting club boasts of cowboy-action pistol ranges. Down the road, the sprawling landfill bustles and a dozen wind turbines spin gently on the horizon. They tower over pumpjacks known as nodding donkeys that pull oil from wells.

“People around here don’t like change,” said Morgan Morsett, a bartender at Frosty’s Bar & Grill. “They see these wind turbines as something that’s hurting coal and oil.”

But the city gets $675,000 to house turbine blades indefinitely, which can help pay for playground improvements and other services. Landfill manager Cynthia Langston said the blades are much cleaner to store than discarded oil equipment and Casper is happy to take the thousand blades from three in-state wind farms owned by Berkshire Hathaway Inc.’s PacifiCorp. Warren Buffett’s utility has been replacing the original blades and turbines with larger, more powerful models after a decade of operation.
The heart of the wise inclines to the right,
but the heart of the fool to the left.

Nosuperstition
Posts: 3815
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2009 6:45 am

Re: Wind turbines

Post by Nosuperstition »

Look at this picture. This bird is still alive and one of his wings is chopped off. Look at the despair in his eyes.

I can't put this picture out of my mind. I hate windmills. :(
This eagle might or might not be a bald eagle.One person in the old forum said that the bald eagle is a bird of bad morals.So judgemental religious people will not feel the way you feel.
palli or halli in Dravidian languages means a village just like gaav in Aryan languages means a village.palli or halli in Aryan Mauryan Imperial era around 200 B.C designates a tribal hamlet.So many of those in South India are indeed descendants of tribals and are still keeping up that heritage.

Post Reply