Abraham's God Was Anu

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marduk
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Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by marduk »

As the title indicates, I have exposed Abraham's god as being Anu, the high god of Mesopotamia, and not YHVH, a later creation of the Hebrews. Here is the stunning evidence. Abraham's god encouraged him to have a baby with his wife's Egyptian maid-servant, Hagar. That is based on the Law Code of Hammurabi, king of Mesopotamia in Abraham's time, in which he claims to have received them from Anu. Observe, if you will, these excerpts from the law code and how precisely law 146 in particular matches the Biblical story of Abraham. Any court in the world would say it's a positive match.
144. If anyone [a man] takes a wife and his wife gives her husband a
servant, and the servant has children by him, and the man then declares
his intention of taking a side wife [concubine], he shall not be allowed so
to do. He shall have no side wife [concubine].

145. If anyone [a man] takes a wife and she does not bear him any
children, and he has the intention to take a side wife [concubine], if he takes
a side wife and brings her into his house she shall not stand on the same
footing with his wife.

146. If a man takes a wife and this one gives her husband a maid as
wife, and she [the maid] bears him children, and then this maid tries to
place herself on an equality with her mistress, because she has born chil-
dren, her owner is not to sell her for money, but he is to pay her in silver
and reckon her among the servants.
https://archive.org/stream/cu3192406010 ... 3_djvu.txt" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Now I invite any follower of any Abrahamic religion to explain how it is that YHWH would have been telling Abraham to do things that were legal to him in his home town but obviously never in Israel. Is it YHWH policy that a Jewish wife can give her husband a slave woman to have babies with? Just admit the obvious truth, that Abraham's REAL god was Anu and he lived by the laws of Anu, as his god personally encouraged him to do, because that god was in fact none other than Anu himself. Abraham's progeny perverted his true religion, creating the heresy known as Judaism and the made up god known as YHWH. The original "Islam" was Anuism, all else is heresy.

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Fernando
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by Fernando »

Well, to play Devil's Advocate...
Surely gods, if anyone, can change their minds. And men can certainly change gods' names.
I'm not sure, mind you, whether that makes any difference to your argument!
‘Hindus and Muslims belong to two different religious philosophies, social customs and literary traditions. They neither intermarry nor eat together, and indeed they belong to two different civilisations which are based mainly on conflicting ideas and conceptions.’ Muhammad Ali Jinnah

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Takeiteasynow
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by Takeiteasynow »

Abraham's God Was Anu
Unlikely.

1) According to Biblical timelines Abraham was already in Egypt around 2091 BC.
2) Hammurabi published and created his law code around 1760 BC.

So: do you have proof that a historical Abraham existed in the 18th century BC?
Abraham= H'ammu'rab(b)i, Historical Muhammad=Benjamin of Tiberias. Islam: Syncretic Israelite Yahwishm Deity: nameless, epithets Dsr, El Qutbay, ʼAlâhâ, Allāh. Ka'ba: Kutha => Samaria => Petra=> Makkah. Hijrah 622: Petra => Kerak

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Fernando
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by Fernando »

Takeiteasynow wrote:
Abraham's God Was Anu
Unlikely.

1) According to Biblical timelines Abraham was already in Egypt around 2091 BC.
2) Hammurabi published and created his law code around 1760 BC.

So: do you have proof that a historical Abraham existed in the 18th century BC?
When is he supposed to have built the Kaaba?
‘Hindus and Muslims belong to two different religious philosophies, social customs and literary traditions. They neither intermarry nor eat together, and indeed they belong to two different civilisations which are based mainly on conflicting ideas and conceptions.’ Muhammad Ali Jinnah

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Takeiteasynow
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by Takeiteasynow »

When is he supposed to have built the Kaaba?
Dunno. The problem with Abraham is that he lived for almost two centuries, had way too much free time so decided to bore his offspring with fancy buildings. If they only had construction toys like Lego back in those days....
Abraham= H'ammu'rab(b)i, Historical Muhammad=Benjamin of Tiberias. Islam: Syncretic Israelite Yahwishm Deity: nameless, epithets Dsr, El Qutbay, ʼAlâhâ, Allāh. Ka'ba: Kutha => Samaria => Petra=> Makkah. Hijrah 622: Petra => Kerak

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manfred
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by manfred »

Is it YHWH policy that a Jewish wife can give her husband a slave woman to have babies with?
Have you read the story about Ishmael and Hagar in the bible? It is a very human story, and a tragedy.

Abraham, because his wife was already old and he had no heir, turned to Hagar, his wife's maid. as a "surrogate" ... No suggestion that this is on the "orders" of any deity, it was simply Abraham's decision to meet his own specific needs as he saw them, and the original idea came from Sarah, his wife. After Hagar got pregnant, Sarah and her quarrelled a lot, and at one point Hagar tied to run away. Only then, the author tells us of a divine intervention which caused Hagar to return to Sarah and Abraham, trying to make peace. It did not last long.

Then his wife Sarah, against expectations, also got pregnant, something "predicted" to Abraham, we are told. If this is so, then Abraham's decision to father a child with Hagar is presented to us as almost an act of unbelief, and not a divine order as you suggest.

Things get from bad to worse.... The two mothers see each other a rivals, worse than ever, and the two children quarrel also, with the eldest Ishmael, seeing the younger Isaac as someone taking his birthright.

Eventually Abraham, at the insistence of his wife, horribly, but on a human level, understandably, sends Hagar and Ishmael away. This is in contrast to the "angel" from Genesis 16 asking Hagar to return and make peace. Hagar and Ishmael leave. They survive, but Ishmael remains bitter and angry all his life, as the angel's prediction suggested.

So, first of all, Abraham in the bible is not the robotic "prophet" Muslims see ... he is a human being who is not immune to making mistakes and making a mess of his life, like the rest of us. But he does also show that he has faith and tries to correct his mistakes. He is not the perfect "prophet" of the Muslims, but a man, like you and me, trying and sometimes succeeding, sometimes failing.

The story of Ishmael in the bible is lost on Muslims.... it it a warning against polygamy, a very early one, which took a long time to be fully accepted by the Jews. If you know Muslim men with more than one wife, you will invariably hear the echoes of Abraham's and Ishmael's tragedy re-enacted, over and over. The would do well to look closely and learn.
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marduk
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

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About the dating of Abraham and King Hammurabi, this quote seems to make sense.
Therefore, according to historical and Biblical evidence, Abraham was born somewhere in the range of 1852-1872 BCE and died 175 years later (1677-1697). If the 400 years are accounted for differently, these dates could change significantly.
https://christianity.stackexchange.com/ ... aham-alive
And this one.
Hammurabi (c. 1810 – c. 1750 BC) was the sixth king of the First Babylonian Dynasty, reigning from c. 1792 BC to c. 1750 BC
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hammurabi
Abraham didn't die until 1677-1697 BCE and was born in the mid-1800s BCE. Since he could live for a super=long time, there was plenty of opportunity for them to overlap. And even if Abraham lived much earlier than that, Hammurabi could have used laws based on customs going back centuries and merely ascribed them to Anu. The point is, YHVH never authorized having babies with slave women so how was Abe's god YHVH? It was clearly a Mesopotamian god. Or is it someone here's opinion that "God" wants men to have babies with slave women if their wives give them to them for that purpose. So let's get at it. First get your wife to buy a woman, then get her to give her to you to have a baby with. it'll be fun, and perfectly sanctioned by "God".

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manfred
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by manfred »

Does that make sense to you? He really lived 175 years? We do not know the exact year or his birth or death, nor can we even be 100% certain he was even a real person. The sources place Abraham in Ur, Chaldea, but that seems to be an anachronism for the time, or so do some at least argue. Generally, we can place him around 2000 BC, maybe a little later. This is worked out on the basis that we know roughly when the exodus was, and Abraham was some 600 years before then. Biblical texts often allude to very old age as a way to honour a person, I don't think you can really take that as fact.

Muslims tend to date him at least 500 years before then, because of their legend that he met Nimrod. This is not supported by biblical sources.
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marduk
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

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manfred wrote:Does that make sense to you? He really lived 175 years? We do not know the exact year or his birth or death, nor can we even be 100% certain he was even a real person. The sources place Abraham in Ur, Chaldea, but that seems to be an anachronism for the time, or so do some at least argue. Generally, we can place him around 2000 BC, maybe a little later. This is worked out on the basis that we know roughly when the exodus was, and Abraham was some 600 years before then. Biblical texts often allude to very old age as a way to honour a person, I don't think you can really take that as fact.

Muslims tend to date him at least 500 years before then, because of their legend that he met Nimrod. This is not supported by biblical sources.
I previously thought Abe was a myth myself but after finding those laws which exactly match the Abe story I now believe he really did exist, and apparently his god was familiar with and encouraged the Mesopotamian law or custom regarding slave women and babies. Why would the Jews record those details unless they were true, considering they go against YHVH law? No, Abe was real alright, and he apparently raped a slave woman and had a baby by her. Let us revere him, huh? I can see why the Muslims and Jews have always been so fond of enslaving folk, the progenitor of their entire religions was a slave raping monster, and his wife was a slave owner and slave abuser, according to the Torah. He beat that poor girl so bad she ran away into the desert to die of thirst rather than take the torture of Abe's devil-woman wife. Nice couple, huh?

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manfred
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by manfred »

He raped a slave woman? Where did you find that?

As to slaves, or servants, those were common place in the ancient world, but in most societies you were expected to treat them with dignity. You would find few people with means in the ancient world who did not have slaves. That does not make it fine, but it does not mean that anyone who had a slave was a monster.

The biblical account does not speak of Abraham raping Hagar. She would have to agree to Sarah's plan. She did, as it would raise her status in the household and may also benefit her materially. She did not anticipate the heart-ache to come. Sarah was not a monster, just a normal woman with normal feelings. She was jealous and worried about her own position. She did not like sharing her husband. She had hoped that Abraham would say no to her surrogacy idea, but he did not.

And she herself had a child things got worse. Who would be Abraham's heir? The tension between the women reflected itself in the children, and the situation got untenable. So Sarah asked Abraham to send Hagar and Ishmael away. It was rather a coward's way out, but that is what he did.

What the story is telling us is a variation of a great many such tales, found today all over the Muslim world. In effect it is a warning about polygamy.

And we are not to merely "revere" Abraham, we are meant to learn something from his life. And you can do that because he was not some sanitised cardboard cut out, some "ideal", but because he is presented to us warts and all.

Was he real? I cannot prove that, but there is fair evidence that he was. But even if he was not, his story is a very human one which is relevant today.
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

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The sources place Abraham in Ur, Chaldea, but that seems to be an anachronism for the time, or so do some at least argue.
We already found some links between Abraham-ism and Ur previously. The following study argues that polytheism in Mesopotamia may be a degradation of primitive monotheism in a scientific sense - deriving from Anu the Sun/Earth God and a female deity - like other studies indicate monotheistic religions in Jordan thousands of years before Christ.

Now the degradation from and return to monotheism is an event often debated in early Greek and Christian literature, especially among Arab tribes (from 1st century BC)

MONOTHEISM AS THE PREDECESSOR OF POLYTHEISM IN SUMERIAN RELIGION
https://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/ ... -2_136.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Abraham= H'ammu'rab(b)i, Historical Muhammad=Benjamin of Tiberias. Islam: Syncretic Israelite Yahwishm Deity: nameless, epithets Dsr, El Qutbay, ʼAlâhâ, Allāh. Ka'ba: Kutha => Samaria => Petra=> Makkah. Hijrah 622: Petra => Kerak

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marduk
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

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I'm afraid the case of Abe's god not being YHVH is very strong indeed. I may have been wrong about the god being Anu though. Do you know what "Salem" was? It was a Canaanite city which was later renamed "Jerusalem". There was no such thing as Judaism at that time, so obviously the Priest-King of Salem was the priest of the Canaanite high god El. Now observe the following exhibit;
18 Then Melchizedek king of Salem brought out bread and wine. He was priest of God Most High, 19 and he blessed Abram, saying,

“Blessed be Abram by God Most High,
Creator of heaven and earth.
20
And praise be to God Most High,
who delivered your enemies into your hand.”

Then Abram gave him a tenth of everything.

Source: Genesis 14
Well well, Abe got blessed by the Canaanite god El, and he loved it. Case closed. Oh, and by the way, if Jesus is supposed to be a "priest like Melchizedek" then he must be a priest of El. Hmm, Melchizedek "brought out bread and wine", eh? Interesting. So it WAS El in the beginning, then it got perverted and corrupted by the evil ones in Babylon.

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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

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Ehm... The Hebrew word for "god" is "el" The Canaanites had a whole plethora of gods. There isn't one plainly called "el", but one of them was called Ēl ʿElyōn, the "highest god". This was MODELLED and adapted from the God of the Israelites. Like in many polytheistic societies, when a new deity on heard about, rather than distancing themselves from that, it is simply added to the the one already worshipped. The Romans even had a shrine to the "unknown god" in case they missed one. But "Ēl ʿElyōn" is historically later than Abraham, so I am not sure we can assume a connection, tentatively based on a common Hebrew word only. The word Elyōn is a common place word, and means the top-most, the highest. It is applied to a basket in Genesis 40.17 or to a chamber in Ezekiel 42.5. So it is not a name.

So, while it is correct that Abraham could hardly have called his God "YHWH" as that is connected with Moses and the burning bush many centuries later, the sources suggest strongly that Abraham was a monotheist. We do not know if he used a name for his God, but the biblical text are clear that this one God worshipped by Abraham became the God of the Israelites.
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by Takeiteasynow »

Anu or Yahweh?

The following lead is fascinating. Around 1700 BC civilizations centered in the Near East start suddenly converting from polytheism to benotheism, one god over all others. Archeological evidence discovered at the Migdol Temple near Pella (Jordan) documents this transition and show the evolution of Canaanite beliefs to the idea of monotheism. Most recent material from this temple that has been analyzed (2010) suggests that this conversion to monotheism arose more or less simultaniously among the classical states such as Edom, Damascus, Moab and Israel where all tribes unite under Abraham and the 'God of Laws'.

Now the location of Pella is central to Damascus, Samaria, Jerusalem, Petra and Kerak - the places where the first manifestations of benotheism occured. The time of transformation matches the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, south of Pella.

Migdol Temple
Its massive stones still clinging to the damp hills of the Jordan River Valley, the Migdol Temple at first appears to be little more than an ancient network of fortified walls. Yet when Jordanian and Australian archaeologists working at the site of ancient Pella began piecing it together in 1997, it didn’t take them long to realize that they were reconstructing something extraordinary: a 3,600-year-old textbook in stone.

Measuring an impressive 29 by 22 meters, the Migdol Temple is the largest Bronze and Iron Age Temple known to man, an enormous structure justified in its size and emotional impact to the worship of a single God, and which may at one point have functioned as a four-storey temple to the Canaanite god El. These days, however, religious and historical scholars are far less excited about the temple’s size than by the magnitude of its historical importance.

During the approximately 800 years of its occupation, those who used the Migdol Temple slowly changed their Bronze Age polytheistic beliefs into Iron Age "henotheistic" beliefs, a period during which officials allowed communities to believe in more than one god, but encouraged them to concentrate their veneration on one god over all others.

Known as "state monotheism," the most famous example of this change in belief is that of Yahweh in Israel. But according to Bourke, archaeological evidence is revealing that this new emphasis on one god was not reserved for the Israelites, but occurred simultaneously in several nation states throughout the Middle East, with Yahweh in Israel, Hadad in Damascus, Milkom in Amman, Chemos in Moab (in present-day Jordan) and Qos in Edom (in present-day Israel).

The newest finds at the Migdol Temple suggest that the region had its own distinct form of monotheism, and that monotheism arose in several areas of the Middle East at once in order to unify small nation-states.
"The Migdol Pella Temple evidence suggests that the pathway to national consciousness occurs in many different centers at around the same time in effectively the same way," said Bourke.
This would be the perfect location for the birth of Abraham-ism. Unfortunately the stone tables found at the Migdol Temple have not been published yet.

http://cogweb.ucla.edu/Culture/Monotheism.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... e_2001.jpg" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Abraham= H'ammu'rab(b)i, Historical Muhammad=Benjamin of Tiberias. Islam: Syncretic Israelite Yahwishm Deity: nameless, epithets Dsr, El Qutbay, ʼAlâhâ, Allāh. Ka'ba: Kutha => Samaria => Petra=> Makkah. Hijrah 622: Petra => Kerak

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marduk
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

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manfred wrote:Ehm... The Hebrew word for "god" is "el" The Canaanites had a whole plethora of gods. There isn't one plainly called "el", but one of them was called Ēl ʿElyōn, the "highest god". This was MODELLED and adapted from the God of the Israelites. Like in many polytheistic societies, when a new deity on heard about, rather than distancing themselves from that, it is simply added to the the one already worshipped. The Romans even had a shrine to the "unknown god" in case they missed one. But "Ēl ʿElyōn" is historically later than Abraham, so I am not sure we can assume a connection, tentatively based on a common Hebrew word only. The word Elyōn is a common place word, and means the top-most, the highest. It is applied to a basket in Genesis 40.17 or to a chamber in Ezekiel 42.5. So it is not a name.

So, while it is correct that Abraham could hardly have called his God "YHWH" as that is connected with Moses and the burning bush many centuries later, the sources suggest strongly that Abraham was a monotheist. We do not know if he used a name for his God, but the biblical text are clear that this one God worshipped by Abraham became the God of the Israelites.
Well the god of Salem sure had no connection with Israelites, since Israel didn't exist at that time. It was certainly not YHVH. Here's some information about Salem;
Shalim (Shalem, Salem, and Salim) is a god in the Canaanite religion pantheon, mentioned in inscriptions found in Ugarit (Ras Shamra) in Syria.[1][2] William F. Albright identified Shalim as the god of dusk, and Shahar as god of the dawn.[3] In the Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible, Shalim is also identified as the deity representing Venus or the "Evening Star", and Shahar, the "Morning Star".[1] His name derives from the triconsonantal Semitic root S-L-M. The city of Jerusalem was named after him, and the biblical King Solomon may also have been.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shalim
As you can see, it was actually Venus which was the deity of Salem, the deity's actual name being Salem. Now I ask you, would YHVH be having his followers use a location for his temple which is actually a center for Venus worship? And would he have them use the actual name of said deity in the name of the city? It's not JeruYHVH. That's Lord Salem's city and temple site. Solomon was named after him which is why he built a temple to him. YHVH is a much later fabrication.

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Takeiteasynow
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by Takeiteasynow »

Well, there seems to be some strong archeological evidence for parts of Marduk's hypothesis. Which may lead to another revisionist hypothesis....

Is Abraham Hammurabi?
  • The Jewish Calendar is missing 165 to 240 years. If this is taken into account then Abraham may live in Hammurabi's timeline, 1810BC to 1750 BC.
  • The center of Canaanite religion at this time is near Pella where polytheism evolves to benotheism, one god over all others and later into monotheism.
  • The supreme god in Pella's Migdol Temple is nameless, like Yahweh.
  • Hammurabi conquers Canaan. What happens next? Does he inject his law code into the center of Canaanite religion? Canaanites used the Babylonian language and script so the extension of this hybrid benotheistic or henotheistic religion would not have been that difficult.
  • There are countless parallels that indicate that the Canaanite religion starts transforming under influence of Babylonian theology during the reign of Hammurabi.
  • Hammurabi's code of law derives originally from Ur-Nammu - his codification is more complete.
  • Hammurabi descends from the Amorites, originally from southern Syria/Jordan.
So let's take this a step further. Why not make Hammurabi Abraham? But as ancient Judaism states that all laws come from God the historical figure Hammurabi needed to be replaced by a prophet with a different role - one who catalyzed the birth of monotheism or in this case, Abrahamism.

The difference with Marduk's scenario is that the Amorites first influenced Babylon theology, around 2000 BC, before Hammurabi did the same around 1750 BC.

More reading:
1) Relation between Canaan and Babylonia in the Hammurabi Epoch.
https://biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/expo ... 10-128.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

2) In search of the Biblical Hammurabi
http://jbq.jewishbible.org/assets/Uploa ... murabi.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Abraham= H'ammu'rab(b)i, Historical Muhammad=Benjamin of Tiberias. Islam: Syncretic Israelite Yahwishm Deity: nameless, epithets Dsr, El Qutbay, ʼAlâhâ, Allāh. Ka'ba: Kutha => Samaria => Petra=> Makkah. Hijrah 622: Petra => Kerak

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manfred
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by manfred »

Marduk, that is a useful observation. In fact, the Israelites did not simply suggest that other deities did not exist, but instead they "demoted" them to other beings, generally demons or spirits of some kind. Angels also can be traced to this process.

As to Jerusalem's name, the first thing you need to realise is that it was NOT founded and named by the Israelites, but by the Canaanites. The the exact name had simply been taken over by the Israelites, but adopted to their language.

The precise meaning is uncertain. Many suggest it means the "Keep(castle) of Jeru", or the "Peace (place) of Jeru". But that may be a much later explanation, and not very likely. When we want to get the meaning of the name of the city, we need to look at the CANAANITES who first names it. That indeed suggests the verb yaru (“to establish”) and the name Shalim (or Salem), the Canaanite god of dusk.

The Israelites simply kept the name but changed its meaning.
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by Fernando »

manfred wrote: When we want to get the meaning of the name of the city, we need to look at the CANAANITES who first names it. That indeed suggests the verb yaru (“to establish”) and the name Shalim (or Salem), the Canaanite god of dusk.
Goodness me, Manfred - be careful what you say! Think of the root! I dare only whisper this:SAM's Place? Quiet, or our wandering boy will be calling Jerusalem his own!
‘Hindus and Muslims belong to two different religious philosophies, social customs and literary traditions. They neither intermarry nor eat together, and indeed they belong to two different civilisations which are based mainly on conflicting ideas and conceptions.’ Muhammad Ali Jinnah

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marduk
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by marduk »

Interesting post, Takeiteasynow. I'll view the sites you linked. One thing's for sure, YHVH is not the original deity of Abraham and the early patriarchs. In fact, the Bible clearly shows that the "Queen of Heaven", Asherah, was more popular until the kings of Israel had her followers all killed. Yahwism only exists today because of genocide, ironically. Whenever Jews gripe about genocide just ask them what happened to all the Asherah worshipers? I don't recall any mass conversions by verbal persuasion in there. There was no compulsion though. They had the free choice of YHVH or death. I see where Muslims got the idea now.

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manfred
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Re: Abraham's God Was Anu

Post by manfred »

Fernando wrote:
manfred wrote: When we want to get the meaning of the name of the city, we need to look at the CANAANITES who first names it. That indeed suggests the verb yaru (“to establish”) and the name Shalim (or Salem), the Canaanite god of dusk.
Goodness me, Manfred - be careful what you say! Think of the root! I dare only whisper this:SAM's Place? Quiet, or our wandering boy will be calling Jerusalem his own!
LOL....

The "Palestinians" sometimes claim to be the "Canaanites". In reality these people were absorbed into Israel and disappeared from the record long ago.

There is an interesting text about the Canaanites in a Jewish source from about 150BC called the Book of Jubilees.
And Canaan saw the land of Lebanon to the river of Egypt, that it was very good, and he went not into the land of his inheritance to the west (that is to) the sea, and he dwelt in the land of Lebanon, eastward and westward from the border of Jordan and from the border of the sea. And Ham, his father, and Cush and Mizraim his brothers said unto him: 'Thou hast settled in a land which is not thine, and which did not fall to us by lot: do not do so; for if thou dost do so, thou and thy sons will fall in the land and (be) accursed through sedition; for by sedition ye have settled, and by sedition will thy children fall, and thou shalt be rooted out for ever. Dwell not in the dwelling of Shem; for to Shem and to his sons did it come by their lot. Cursed art thou, and cursed shalt thou be beyond all the sons of Noah, by the curse by which we bound ourselves by an oath in the presence of the holy judge, and in the presence of Noah our father.' But he did not hearken unto them, and dwelt in the land of Lebanon from Hamath to the entering of Egypt, he and his sons until this day. And for this reason that land is named Canaan.
—Jubilees 10:29-34.
It says that The Canaanites settled orginally in Lebanon, and then spread out, taking land that does not soecifcally belong to them as per a pre-existing agreement.

Most later, there was a long struggle between the Canaanites and the Israelites. Eventually they were defeated, and the historical record becomes murky... the most likely scenario is that they simply inter-married and became part of Israel.

And by the time King David conquered Jerusalem, the place was held by a tribe of the Hittites, the Jebusites. These were only tentatively connected to Canaan.

The argument the book of Jubilees is making is essentially the same as sum generally makes in this connection. If you take land by conquest, then what right do you have complaining if others do the same?
And David and all Israel went to Jerusalem, that is, Jebus, where the Jebusites were, the inhabitants of the land. The inhabitants of Jebus said to David, “You will not come in here.” Nevertheless, David took the stronghold of Zion, that is, the city of David.
— 1 Chronicles 11:4-5
So, just as a matter of fact, David did what the Canaanites did before. There is one other interesting bit in that quote: "the stronghold of Zion". Zion is one of the two hills of Jerusalem. It had a "stronghold", i.e. a keep or castle. So by that time the conventional etymology seems established.
Jesus: "Ask and you will receive." Mohammed: "Take and give me 20%"

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