News from Pakistan

Discuss world politics in relation to Islam and Muslims.
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antineoETC
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News from Pakistan

Post by antineoETC »

'Refusing to let girls go to school in their hijabs is horrifying' says Malala Yousafzai FULL ARTICLE

Perhaps not so "horrifying'" if you are a girl being forced to go to school in a hijab against your will by your fathers, mother's, brothers, cousins etc etc. To such girls, who undoubtedly exist, the school hijab ban will be a blessed liberation However, I do believe most who wear hijab do so out of choice - to the extent that a person CAN choose when they have been subjected to the intense Islamic brainwashing since birth, which includes being terrorized by the vivid descriptions of the horrific eternal punishments that await females that do not swathe their head and body in cloth.

From an Islamic point of view Malala is showing a little too much hair under her lacy headscarf but has obviously convinced herself that Allah allows such laxity. Despite what Islam has done to her she obviously just can't let go of her lifelong attachment to this cult. She clearly deludes herself that Islam is a female-friendly religion that lets girls go to school. The trouble with "Islam is whatever I want it to be" Muslims is that they encourage unwary non-Muslims to believe the lies they tell themselves. "Look at Masala" the eager-to-be-lied-to western "progressives" will say. 'She PROVES you can be a devout Muslim AND believe in women's rights'.

Unfortunately, the Taliban and like-minded groups aren't going to be swayed by Malala's insistence that they are "extemists" who have corrupted the allegedly woman-friendly religion of Islam for their nefarious "patriarchal" ends. Or perhaps she should pay them a visit in Afghanistan and explain to them how their understanding of Islam is flawed.

And while millions self-deluding female climgers to Islam like Malala continue to belong to this cult they help perpetuate it and thereby ensure that groups like the Taliban will continue to arise to threaten women the world over.

Such women, unlike the likes of Ayaan Hirsi Ali, are therefore part of the problem and not of the solution.

Tragic really.
"Prophet Muhammad...bought, sold, captured, and owned slaves" SOURCE: BBC website
"Muhammad is considered to be a perfect model" SOURCE: BBC website
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Ariel
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by Ariel »

She ones posed a question to an audience: “If one man can destroy everything, then why can’t one girl change it?”

As far I can see, she has not changed anything. And yet, she won a Nobel Peace Prize, while Ayaan Hirsi Ali ...who should have... never won a Nobel Peace Prize.

It stunned me why a girl who was shot in her head, and was saved by western doctors, got all this attention. Like she was extra special. The girl thanked allah because he had given her this new life. :clueless:
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antineoETC
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by antineoETC »

Ariel wrote:As far I can see, she has not changed anything. And yet, she won a Nobel Peace Prize, while Ayaan Hirsi Ali ...who should have... never won a Nobel Peace Prize.
Her outright rejection of Islam has made Ayaan Persona non Grata to those who dole out Nobel Peace Prizes. Malala got the peace prize because she absolves Islam of responsibility for what happened to her ie is a campaigner against "Islamophobia".
"Prophet Muhammad...bought, sold, captured, and owned slaves" SOURCE: BBC website
"Muhammad is considered to be a perfect model" SOURCE: BBC website
antineoETC
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by antineoETC »

"Prophet Muhammad...bought, sold, captured, and owned slaves" SOURCE: BBC website
"Muhammad is considered to be a perfect model" SOURCE: BBC website
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Ariel
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by Ariel »

No fun allowed in Islam, and for sure not in the holy month of ramadan.
Noor-ul-Haq Qadri requests PM Imran Khan to ban game shows during Ramadan

Federal Minister for Religious Affairs and Inter-faith Harmony Noor-ul-Haq Qadri on Sunday wrote a letter to Prime Minister Imran Khan, requesting to put a ban on game shows during the month of Ramadan.

In a letter shared by the Ministry of Religious Affairs and Interfaith Harmony on Twitter, Noor-ul-Haq mentioned six guiding principles of Ramadan broadcasting on the complaints issued by the public.

The letter said that the promotion of religious and professional harmony during the holy month should be the top priority of the Ramadan broadcast. It further said that “controversial issues and professional topics should be avoided.”

The letter also stated that the show hosts should be equipped with the necessary knowledge, adding that the dress code of the hosts and guests should be in accordance with the holy month.

It further said that “respect for holy figures and adherents of different sects should be kept in mind.” Moreover, broadcasting game shows and frivolous programmes during Sehr and Iftar should be avoided.

It added that immoral and inappropriate advertisements should be banned during the month.

The letter also stated that the Ministry of Information Technology and Telecommunication and Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA) should issue appropriate instructions to TV channels in this regard.
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Ariel
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by Ariel »

Religion-fuelled mobs on the rise again in Pakistan

Last month, a man named Muhammad Mushtaq was accused of burning pages of the Quran inside a mosque in central Pakistan. A mob armed with sticks, bricks and axes gathered at the mosque and dragged him out.

Mushtaq was tortured for hours and eventually killed, his body hung from a tree. A handful of police officers were among those who watched.

The Feb 12 killing in the district of Khanewal was denounced across Pakistan. Prime Minister Imran Khan said the government had “zero tolerance” for such mob violence and promised that the police officers would be punished.

But lynching over offences to Islam, real or imagined, are far from new in Pakistan, where blasphemy is punishable by death. Rights activists say lynch mobs exploit anti-blasphemy laws to take matters into their own hands.

In recent years these episodes have risen to an alarming level, with increasing cases of fatal violence.

Critics and rights activists say that vows like those made by the prime minister are mere lip service and that Khan’s government, much like his predecessors, has not taken any practical steps to curb violence.

Instances of mob violence, and state-enforced criminal blasphemy cases, are more frequent in Pakistan than anywhere else, according to a report by the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom.

“The lack of political will and commitment has always stood as the biggest obstacle to prevent the abuse, misuse, and exploitation of blasphemy laws,” said Tahira Abdullah, a rights activist based in Islamabad.

Khan’s government is no different from its predecessors in promising to tackle the menace of religious violence, she said. But “it is too cowardly to confront” influential religious parties in parliament, Abdullah said, “and the rampaging militant extremist groups outside parliament.”

Blasphemy allegations have led to the vandalizing of Hindu temples and neighborhoods, the burning of police stations by angry mobs, the lynching of a student on a university campus and the killing of a provincial governor by his own security guard. After Musthaq’s killing, a senior police official told a parliamentary committee that 90% of those involved in blasphemy violence are between the ages of 18 and 30.
Spoiler! :
Just two months ago, a Sri Lankan, Priyantha Diyawadanage, was lynched by workers he oversaw in a factory in the eastern city of Sialkot. Diyawadanage was accused of tearing off stickers with religious inscriptions from the factory walls. He was tortured for hours by an enraged mob before his body was thrown off the factory’s rooftop, beaten and set on fire.

In 2021, at least 84 people faced blasphemy accusations in courts and from angry street mobs, according to the Centre for Social Justice, a Lahore-based minority rights group. Three people, including Diyawadanage, were killed by a mob over such allegations, it noted.

In August, a mob in the Rahimyar Khan district, also in Punjab province, damaged statues and burned down a Hindu temple’s main door after a court released an 8-year-old Hindu boy on bail. He had been charged with blasphemy for allegedly urinating in the library of a madrasa.

Defense lawyers are also at risk. In 2014 gunmen murdered a Pakistani lawyer, Rashid Rehman, in Multan city for defending Junaid Hafeez, an academic charged with making derogatory comments about the Prophet Muhammad. Hafeez had been in prison, unable to find a lawyer, before Rehman agreed to take up his case.

In 2011, two politicians were murdered in similar episodes. Salman Taseer, then a provincial governor, was killed by a bodyguard after expressing opposition to blasphemy laws. Shahbaz Bhatti, a federal minister, was murdered for opposing the death sentence imposed on Asia Bibi, a Christian convicted of verbally insulting the Prophet Muhammad. Though Bibi was acquitted in 2019, she fled Pakistan and her lawyer has received death threats.

“The increasing theocratisation of Pakistan and rising militant extremism makes it very difficult for lawyers to defend alleged blasphemers,” Abdullah said. “It takes a great deal of personal courage and professional integrity to withstand huge overt pressure and threats.”

Law enforcement agencies are not trained, or equipped to handle, frenzied vigilante mobs, and find themselves overwhelmed, Abdullah noted.

Pakistan inherited 19th-century British laws outlining punishments for offenses related to blasphemy. But the government revamped these laws in the 1980s, introducing new clauses adding severe penalties and even a death sentence for anyone who insults Islam.

Iran, Brunei and Mauritania are the other three countries that impose the death penalty for insulting religion.

“Since the death penalty, a mandatory punishment for blasphemy, was made a law, there have been several bouts of religion-based violence in Pakistan,” said Peter Jacob, executive director of the Centre for Social Justice.

While no one has ever been executed for the offense, violence against alleged blasphemers is hardly unusual.

Rights activists link the current spike in blasphemy-related violence to the Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan, an emerging radical religious party. And Islamist parties and militant groups in Pakistan have been emboldened by the Taliban’s coming to power in neighbouring Afghanistan last year.

“The government’s narrative about Islamophobia in the rest of the world” fuels the religion-based violence,
Jacob said.

“This narrative builds on anger among the youth, which becomes ready-made ammunition for sporadic but large-scale violence against anyone who is suspected of offering any disrespect to religious persons, scripture, places or articles,” he said.

Tehreek-e-Labbaik, the radical religious party, first came to prominence as an organised force when it demonstrated for the release of Mumtaz Qadri, the police bodyguard who fatally shot Taseer in 2011. Qadri was eventually sentenced to death and hanged in 2016. Since then, it has shaped itself into a political party, contesting elections and continuing to unsettle governments.

In April last year, Tehreek-e-Labbaik organized violent, countrywide protests demanding the expulsion of the French ambassador after President Emmanuel Macron of France eulogized a French teacher murdered for showing caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad in a classroom.

The Pakistani Taliban have also announced support for anti-blasphemy campaigns and promoted armed struggle to protect the honour of Islam.

Posters offering a reward of some $56,000 to kill Faraz Pervaiz, a Pakistani Christian, for posting anti-Islamic content on social media often appear in anti-blasphemy protests in the country.

Pervaiz, 34, now living in self-exile in Thailand, said that he started speaking out for the rights of non-Muslim communities on social media after a Muslim mob attacked a Christian neighbourhood in Lahore in 2013, torching more than 150 houses and two churches following reports that a Christian sanitation worker had blasphemed the Prophet Muhammad.

“Even in Thailand, I feel insecure,” he said after a Pakistani Muslim refugee shared one of his videos and his location on social media. Pervaiz left the country in 2014 after receiving threats, he said.

Journalists in Pakistan have refrained from reporting on blasphemy cases since the rise of the extremist parties and their growing influence.

“Covering the issue of blasphemy as a journalist, and especially for the Urdu-language press, can either get you killed, or you’ll be fired for jeopardizing the survival of the organization you work for,” said Razeshta Sethna, a journalist and author of a recent report on the stifling media environment in the country.
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Yohan
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by Yohan »

The reason why Muslim women were forced to wear hijab and all sorts of veils was to avoid unwanted sexual advances by Muslim men, as per regulations created by a sex-crazy man named Mohammed - the founder of Islam. After centuries of forced wearing of it, Muslim women developed a classic Stockholm syndrome, and now claim that hijab is a proud symbol of religious pride. They insist on wearing it, even when they are free to discard it. It is another example of how Islam did a permanent damage to Muslim brain.
sum
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by sum »

Re Yohan`s post.

The randy muslims were molesting women which included muslim women. As far as Muhammad was concerned it was quite unacceptable for muslim women to be molested by muslim men and so he ruled that muslim women who had reached puberty should wear the hijab so as to distinguish them from non-muslim women and so avoid molestation. This makes it very clear that Muhammad did not mind non-muslim women being molested and could be one reason why muslim men, especially in the West today, molest and rape non-muslim women as Muhammad was not concerned by this. It was a "silent and inferred permission" for muslim men to sexually assault non-muslim women.

sum
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Ariel
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by Ariel »

The man didn’t know what a QR code was and believed it contained an Arabic inscription of the Prophet Muhammad’s name.
This Guy Threatened to Burn Down a Pepsi Truck Over QR Codes

Image

Podcaster Imran Noshad Khan was walking on a busy road in Pakistan’s seafront city Karachi on New Year’s Eve, when he noticed a crowd forming around a parked Pepsi beverage truck.

He heard two men fighting on the side of the street. One of them was pointing at the QR code on a 7Up bottle, a soft drink distributed under the Pepsi brand. He said something that made Khan stop in his tracks.

“One of the men was saying [to the truck driver], ‘This has Prophet Muhammad’s name written on it. I’m going to set fire to your truck. I’m going to kill you if you don’t fix this’,” Khan told VICE World News.

Khan walked up to the man threatening the truck driver and asked him what the commotion was about. The man, who identified himself as Mullah, insisted Khan take out his phone to record a video of his statement.

In the video that has since gone viral on social media, Mullah holds up the 7Up bottle and points at the QR code printed on its side and says, “Look, it has Muhammad’s name written on it.” Mullah then refuses to acknowledge Khan’s attempts at clarifying that the inscription is a QR code.

Beverage companies often use QR codes on bottles and cans for consumers to scan in order to access more nutritional and manufacturing information.

Mullah went on to say, “I request the company to remove this mark. I will be grateful if they do but if they don’t, there will be a big war. We will lie down in front of this truck and we will burn it down.” He then threatens that if his demand is not met within two or three days, he would set fire to any of the company’s trucks he’d come across.

“I can do anything for Allah. I can sacrifice my life for him. Why is my Prophet’s name written here?” Mullah said.

“He was speaking with such passion like he was full of lava. I felt his spit land on my face – he was talking with such force. His eyes were red and he was sweating. When I saw that, I got scared feeling that I have gotten involved in the wrong situation and that I could be in danger, too,” said Khan.

Khan wasn’t wrong to be fearful. In Pakistan, where blasphemy is a crime punishable by death, even the semblance of blasphemy or any content interpreted as offensive to Islam can spark mob-led attacks. Last month, a Sri Lankan factory manager in the city of Sialkot accused of tearing stickers bearing the Prophet Muhammad’s name was lynched to death by a crowd chanting anti-blasphemy slogans. Since 1990, around 77 people have been killed in anti-blasphemy mob violence in the country.

After recording the video, Khan attempted to defuse the situation by trying to reason with Mullah and the crowd, which had become increasingly aggressive. Khan helped the truck driver get back into his vehicle to escape the scene. As Khan himself began to depart, Mullah cried out to him saying that he was a part of the extremist group Jammat-ud-Dawa, that he had “fought in Kashmir”, and that he has connections in “high places,” insinuating that the matter won’t end with them departing.

Khan has not reported the incident to the police and has yet to be contacted by provincial government authorities, whom he tagged when he uploaded the video on Twitter.
“Even if they did [contact me], I would never go to them or sit with them to discuss it. Our government plays the religion card itself. This is how they run their business,” said Khan. “When it comes to such problems, they ignore it.”

PepsiCo Pakistan did not respond to VICE World News’ requests for comment. However, Khan said a representative from the local Pepsi partner and franchise owner Pakistan Beverage Limited, which owned the truck, reached out to him and thanked him for his help. The company said they were trying to ensure the safety of their staff in light of the incident.
https://www.vice.com/en/article/n7n7n7/ ... -blasphemy
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Ariel
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by Ariel »

More misunderstanding over a QR code
Islamists destroy billboards of Samsung Mobile in Karachi over allegedly blasphemous QR code

Dozens of Islamists belonging to extremist Barelvi organisation Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan (TLP) unleashed mayhem in the mobile market of Karachi, Pakistan, after rumours of an alleged blasphemy against the company. The protestors tore down the billboards of Samsung in the mobile market in the city and indulged in vandalism after they heard that the company has committed ‘blasphemy’ against Islam.

The protests were not limited to the mobile market as billboards in several locations across the city faced the ire of the angry TLP members.

Initial rumours circulating about the incident said that Samsung had introduced a QR code on its devices which is blasphemous. Following this, the Islamists took to the streets of Karachi and started attacking the company’s billboards.

However, later on, a new rumour started circulating that the ‘blasphemy’ was committed by an employee of Samsung Mobile who had given a ‘blasphemous’ name to his WiFi network.

While nobody is sure what was the exact ‘blasphemy’ that was committed, it hasn’t stopped TLP extremists from creating mayhem on the streets of Karachi venting their anger against Samsung Mobile.

Blasphemy by QR codes is not something new in Pakistan


Last year on December 31, a Pakistani man threatened American behemoth Pepsi for printing a QR code with the name of Prophet Muhammad on its 7UP bottles.

The man threatened a Pepsi company’s truck driver with dire consequences if the QR Code on a 7 UP soft drink bottle is not removed by the company. On enquiring, the man, who identified himself as Mulla, insisted that the QR code is actually the name of Prophet Muhammad and if the company does not remove the logo he will burn the truck.
https://www.opindia.com/2022/07/barelvi ... blasphemy/
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antineoETC
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by antineoETC »

The term 'QR' code is itself blasphemous owing to its use of letters from the would QURAN.
"Prophet Muhammad...bought, sold, captured, and owned slaves" SOURCE: BBC website
"Muhammad is considered to be a perfect model" SOURCE: BBC website
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Ariel
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Re: News from Pakistan

Post by Ariel »

An ‘out of Pakistan’ solution for population control—produce kids in non-Muslim nations

Pakistani media outlets such as Geo News termed the health minister’s suggestion 'out of the box'.

Minister of Health and PPP member Abdul Qadir Patel Monday offered an ‘out of Pakistan’ solution to the population problem—couples wanting more kids should leave the country and add to the Muslim population in nations where they are in minority.

At a seminar in Islamabad, the minister said that by 2030 the population of Pakistan is expected to cross 285 million. “We do not want to decrease the Muslim population. We want Muslims to be better, more educated and provide them with better health care facilities,” he said.

Population is a big reason for Pakistan’s troubles, especially when it remains fragile and debt-ridden. According to a UN projection, Pakistan is set to see a 56 per cent population increase by 2050, which amounts to over 366 million people.

A recent Dawn editorial titled The population bomb highlighted the seriousness of the issue: “We are fighting a losing battle, slipping inexorably towards a dystopian future where want and deprivation will be our lot. The reason? There are simply too many of us: the pace at which Pakistan’s population is growing is fast outstripping our ability to provide for the millions that call this country home. Unbelievably, there still appears to be no well-thought-out and cohesive population control programme in the offing.”

Patel stressed the importance of family planning and awareness while saying that citizens need to stop believing the misinformation that is spread about state’s family planning measures and vaccinations, be it polio or Covid-19. He called this as “very dangerous behavior” on part of the Pakistanis. The United Nations report titled World Population Prospects 2022 lists Pakistan as a leading contributor to population growth. “We are a lot in numbers, masa’Allah,” the minister remarked at the seminar.

While some Pakistanis assume that the minister’s remarks came in jest, others didn’t let his very “childish” statement slide. “What do you expect when Qadir Patel is the Director and Producer of such Comedy,” a user wrote.

Many others wrote Patel off as rather foolish and incompetent and lamented his appointment as the health minister, going as far as to call him a downgrade from ministers like Dr. Faisal Sultan and Dr. Yasmin Rashid.

Some said the minister lacked common sense and brought up his past scandals and controversies — calling him Professor holding a post-doctoral degree in money laundering and gang war crimes.

Controversy not a first for Patel

Abdul Qadir Patel was on trial for alleged links with the Pakistani mafia and evidence had surfaced regarding his role in getting said gangsters’ treatment in a local hospital. The case was registered on the complaint of the Rangers, a federal law enforcement organisation, which alleged Patel’s links with local gangsters and al Qaeda terrorists.

In March, the Sindh High Court turned down his plea to suspend non-bailable warrants against him. “The worst part is @BBhuttozardari an Oxford graduate smiling walking by criminal Qadir Patel”, wrote a Twitter user. Patel was also in the news for his conflict with the PPP and his appointment as the health minister has also come under sharp criticism.
https://theprint.in/go-to-pakistan/an-o ... s/1047190/
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