Ten Saudis seek asylum after princess is allowed to stay

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ygalg
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Ten Saudis seek asylum after princess is allowed to stay

Post by ygalg »

Chairman of home affairs committee welcomes decision to give sanctuary to woman with illegitimate child
By Robert Verkaik, Home Affairs Editor Tuesday, 21 July 2009

Ministers are considering asylum applications for 10 Saudi Arabian nationals who claim they are at risk of persecution if they are forced to return to the Middle Eastern kingdom, it emerged last night.

The new cases were made public after The Independent revealed the plight of a Saudi princess who was granted asylum in Britain after she had an illegitimate child with a British man.

The young woman, who has also been granted anonymity by the courts, won her claim for asylum after she told a court that she faced execution if her husband found out about her adultery and she was forced to return to Saudi Arabia.

Immigration and asylum experts said last night that asylum cases from women fleeing the kingdom were very rare. But Keith Vaz, chairman of the Commons Home Affairs Select Committee, said of the case:
"This is the kind of person that our asylum laws are designed to protect. A woman and her unborn child should under no circumstances be sent back to a country where it is likely that they will be harmed. I welcome the decision made in this case."
New figures released by the Home Office also showed that a further 15 Saudis were refused asylum by the Government last year. There are no details about the sex of each of the applicants nor for the number of asylum applications received this year.

Mr Vaz called for more information to be made public about claims from Saudi Arabia. He said:
"This is a country with a questionable human rights record. It is important to make clear the number of people who are fleeing similar treatment."
The princess's case is one of a small number of claims for asylum brought by citizens of Saudi Arabia which are not openly acknowledged by either government. British diplomats believe that to do so would in effect highlight the persecution of women in Saudi Arabia, which would be viewed as open criticism of the House of Saud and lead to embarrassing publicity for both governments.

The woman, who comes from a very wealthy Saudi family, says she met her English boyfriend – who is not a Muslim – during a visit to London. They struck up a relationship after he gave her his telephone number in a department store. She became pregnant the following year and worried that her elderly husband – a member of the royal family of Saudi Arabia – had become suspicious of her behaviour, she persuaded him to let her visit the UK again to give birth in secret. She feared for her life if she returned to Saudi Arabia.

She persuaded the court that if she returned to the kingdom she would be subject to capital punishment under Sharia law – specifically flogging and stoning to death. She was also worried about the possibility of an honour killing. Since she fled Saudi Arabia, her family and her husband's family have broken off contact with her.

The woman has been granted permanent leave to remain in the UK after the Immigration and Asylum Tribunal allowed her appeal. Keith Best, of the Immigration Advisory Service, said that Saudi nationals who were in genuine fear of persecution had the right to claim asylum in the United Kingdom. He explained:
"They may also be able to claim if they were subjected to degrading and inhumane treatment. I can see why these cases can be difficult for Britain when one considers the relationship with the Saudi royal family and the many military contracts."
One case already refused by the Home Office is that of Yahya Al Faifi who claims he was persecuted in Saudi Arabia for conducting trade union activities, where trade unions are illegal. He and his family fled to the UK before 2006. In 2004, Al Faifi organised a trade union in BAE Systems after the company announced it was cutting pay by 40 per cent. More than 500 workers turned up to the first union meeting. But Mr Al Faifi and two others were sacked by BAE Systems. For several months afterwards Mr Yahya, whose case has been taken up by the RMT in the UK, continued to campaign for workers' rights leading to his case being given considerable media coverage.

However, when he refused to give up, he received repeated threats and was told that if he didn't leave the country immediately "the safety of his family could not be guaranteed". He left Saudi Arabia with his family to seek sanctuary in the UK. But after his case was refused he now faces deportation.

Saudi women: Victims of oppression

*Women are not allowed to drive or ride bicycles on public roads in large cities. But they are allowed to fly aircraft, though they must be chauffeured to the airport.

In September last year, women's rights activists petitioned the King to allow women to drive all vehicles. There were also calls for Saudi Arabian women to be allowed to compete in international sporting events along with their male counterparts. According to Amnesty International discrimination has fuelled violence against women, with foreign domestic workers particularly at risk of abuses such as beatings, rape and even murder, and non-payment of wages. Concerns have been raised that discriminatory laws relating to marriage mean women are trapped in violent and abusive relationships from which they have no legal recourse.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/ho ... 54396.html
“a true believer as a person so fanatically committed to a cause that no amount of reality can make him abandon it” Eric Hoffer
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Chief Chingachgook
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Re: Ten Saudis seek asylum after princess is allowed to stay

Post by Chief Chingachgook »

The princess's case is one of a small number of claims for asylum brought by citizens of Saudi Arabia which are not openly acknowledged by either government. British diplomats believe that to do so would in effect highlight the persecution of women in Saudi Arabia, which would be viewed as open criticism of the House of Saud and lead to embarrassing publicity for both governments.
Soon when Britain becomes Darl-Al-Britainistan asylum seekers would have to look elswhere for there will be no difference between Saudi Babaria and Britainistan. :x
I was chingachgook in the old forum. In this new Reservation forum I was made a Chief :whistling:
passerby
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Re: Ten Saudis seek asylum after princess is allowed to stay

Post by passerby »

Let hope Britain will speed up the creation of Britainistan by letting in more of this kind of garbage so that all British will have no problem visiting any fellow muslim countries. :drool: :drool: :drool:
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Greenhouse28
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Re: Ten Saudis seek asylum after princess is allowed to stay

Post by Greenhouse28 »

as you sow so shall you reap :lol:
britistan will soon be in trouble :*)

so whats the harm in giving santuary to a woman and her unborn child anyway :*)
I am a moderate Muslim God bless you all
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Chiclets
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Re: Ten Saudis seek asylum after princess is allowed to stay

Post by Chiclets »

Greenhouse28 wrote:so whats the harm in giving santuary to a woman and her unborn child anyway :*)
No harm there, in fact I applaud the authorities for helping this woman from deportation. But harm is in retaining those in UK who want to implement sharia, those are the ones who need to be removed from UK.
gupsfu wrote:When someone uses the "taken out of context" argument without explaining what it's really supposed to mean, you know he's lying.
Muslims are so secure in their faith that they need to kill those who don’t share it.
iandonlyhim
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Re: Ten Saudis seek asylum after princess is allowed to stay

Post by iandonlyhim »

This news is slap in face to all those Muslims who say their religion is perfect when it cant give basic freedom to people? Not that I want to support anything wrong anywhere but this is a matter of basic freedom of choice.
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Chief Chingachgook
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Re: Ten Saudis seek asylum after princess is allowed to stay

Post by Chief Chingachgook »

iandonlyhim wrote:This news is slap in face to all those Muslims who say their religion is perfect when it cant give basic freedom to people? Not that I want to support anything wrong anywhere but this is a matter of basic freedom of choice.
Agree fully with you there iandonlyhim. Muslims don't walk the talk verses. Saudi's discrimination of women is next to none. Muslims don't see anything wrong there but instead blame Jews and other kuffar for spreading lies.
I was chingachgook in the old forum. In this new Reservation forum I was made a Chief :whistling:
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sunshine
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Re: Ten Saudis seek asylum after princess is allowed to stay

Post by sunshine »

Spoiler! :
ygalg wrote:
Chairman of home affairs committee welcomes decision to give sanctuary to woman with illegitimate child
By Robert Verkaik, Home Affairs Editor Tuesday, 21 July 2009

Ministers are considering asylum applications for 10 Saudi Arabian nationals who claim they are at risk of persecution if they are forced to return to the Middle Eastern kingdom, it emerged last night.

The new cases were made public after The Independent revealed the plight of a Saudi princess who was granted asylum in Britain after she had an illegitimate child with a British man.

The young woman, who has also been granted anonymity by the courts, won her claim for asylum after she told a court that she faced execution if her husband found out about her adultery and she was forced to return to Saudi Arabia.

Immigration and asylum experts said last night that asylum cases from women fleeing the kingdom were very rare. But Keith Vaz, chairman of the Commons Home Affairs Select Committee, said of the case:
"This is the kind of person that our asylum laws are designed to protect. A woman and her unborn child should under no circumstances be sent back to a country where it is likely that they will be harmed. I welcome the decision made in this case."
New figures released by the Home Office also showed that a further 15 Saudis were refused asylum by the Government last year. There are no details about the sex of each of the applicants nor for the number of asylum applications received this year.

Mr Vaz called for more information to be made public about claims from Saudi Arabia. He said:
"This is a country with a questionable human rights record. It is important to make clear the number of people who are fleeing similar treatment."
The princess's case is one of a small number of claims for asylum brought by citizens of Saudi Arabia which are not openly acknowledged by either government. British diplomats believe that to do so would in effect highlight the persecution of women in Saudi Arabia, which would be viewed as open criticism of the House of Saud and lead to embarrassing publicity for both governments.

The woman, who comes from a very wealthy Saudi family, says she met her English boyfriend – who is not a Muslim – during a visit to London. They struck up a relationship after he gave her his telephone number in a department store. She became pregnant the following year and worried that her elderly husband – a member of the royal family of Saudi Arabia – had become suspicious of her behaviour, she persuaded him to let her visit the UK again to give birth in secret. She feared for her life if she returned to Saudi Arabia.

She persuaded the court that if she returned to the kingdom she would be subject to capital punishment under Sharia law – specifically flogging and stoning to death. She was also worried about the possibility of an honour killing. Since she fled Saudi Arabia, her family and her husband's family have broken off contact with her.

The woman has been granted permanent leave to remain in the UK after the Immigration and Asylum Tribunal allowed her appeal. Keith Best, of the Immigration Advisory Service, said that Saudi nationals who were in genuine fear of persecution had the right to claim asylum in the United Kingdom. He explained:
"They may also be able to claim if they were subjected to degrading and inhumane treatment. I can see why these cases can be difficult for Britain when one considers the relationship with the Saudi royal family and the many military contracts."
One case already refused by the Home Office is that of Yahya Al Faifi who claims he was persecuted in Saudi Arabia for conducting trade union activities, where trade unions are illegal. He and his family fled to the UK before 2006. In 2004, Al Faifi organised a trade union in BAE Systems after the company announced it was cutting pay by 40 per cent. More than 500 workers turned up to the first union meeting. But Mr Al Faifi and two others were sacked by BAE Systems. For several months afterwards Mr Yahya, whose case has been taken up by the RMT in the UK, continued to campaign for workers' rights leading to his case being given considerable media coverage.

However, when he refused to give up, he received repeated threats and was told that if he didn't leave the country immediately "the safety of his family could not be guaranteed". He left Saudi Arabia with his family to seek sanctuary in the UK. But after his case was refused he now faces deportation.

Saudi women: Victims of oppression

*Women are not allowed to drive or ride bicycles on public roads in large cities. But they are allowed to fly aircraft, though they must be chauffeured to the airport.

In September last year, women's rights activists petitioned the King to allow women to drive all vehicles. There were also calls for Saudi Arabian women to be allowed to compete in international sporting events along with their male counterparts. According to Amnesty International discrimination has fuelled violence against women, with foreign domestic workers particularly at risk of abuses such as beatings, rape and even murder, and non-payment of wages. Concerns have been raised that discriminatory laws relating to marriage mean women are trapped in violent and abusive relationships from which they have no legal recourse.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/ho ... 54396.html
Ahhhh.......How lucky is U.K!!! more and and more PEARLS from the land of greatest prophet ever to set foot on earth are coming to U.K as if Pakistani Muslims were not enough. But surly U.K is going to learn a lot about morality from these angels. I wonder why not let more of them in. these people are the best of mankind. why let them perish in the desert. U.K wake up and welcome your Saudi Brothers who will teach u wonderful things like Shareeah in the near future. :worthy: :worthy:
Your beliefs become Your thoughts, Your thoughts become Your words, Your words become Your actions, Your actions become Your habits, Your habits become your Destiny


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iandonlyhim
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Re: Ten Saudis seek asylum after princess is allowed to stay

Post by iandonlyhim »

Chief Chingachgook wrote:
iandonlyhim wrote:This news is slap in face to all those Muslims who say their religion is perfect when it cant give basic freedom to people? Not that I want to support anything wrong anywhere but this is a matter of basic freedom of choice.
Agree fully with you there iandonlyhim. Muslims don't walk the talk verses. Saudi's discrimination of women is next to none. Muslims don't see anything wrong there but instead blame Jews and other kuffar for spreading lies.
Yup, it is one thing to have a view and belief that having children outside of wedlock is wrong and totally other to kill people who have kids outside of wedlock. It is like there is no comparison whatsoever.

And believe me, I do believe that having kids is a matter of big responsibility and both man and woman together should raise them in wedlock also but for people who do not, I still defend their rights to whatever they want to do but instead what do Muslims do? Kill people.... What a joke?

@ Sunshine.... Instead of getting angry at UK for letting these folks in, you should commend UK for it. Why should a person whose crime, if it is AT ALL a crime, is to have sex without marriage get killed?

I commend UK for standing up for freedom. Thank God for countries like her on this planet.
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