Nigeria

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manfred
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Nigeria

Post by manfred »

Jesus: "Ask and you will receive." Mohammed: "Take and give me 20%"
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Ariel
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Re: Nigeria

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An attack by armed gunmen on an all-boys secondary school in Kankara, Katsina state, in Northwestern Nigeria had left more than 300 children missing. Boko Haram claimed responsibility for kidnapping the boys.
Boko Haram claims responsibility for kidnapping hundreds of boys in Nigeria

Doubts over Islamist extremists’ involvement in abduction of more than 300 students last week

The leader of Boko Haram, the Islamist extremist group that abducted hundreds of schoolgirls in Nigeria six years ago, has claimed responsibility for the mass abduction of students in north-western Katsina state last week.

In an audio tape released on Tuesday, Abubakar Shekau said: “Our brothers were behind the abduction in Katsina.”

A large group of men armed with AK-47s overran the all-boys Government Science secondary school in the town of Kankara on Friday night, marching more than 300 students into surrounding forests.

Boko Haram kidnapped 276 girls from their school dormitory in Chibok, in north-eastern Borno state, in April 2014 and about 100 are still missing. The group has also taken other schoolchildren as well as thousands of people across north-east Nigeria and has recently expanded into the country’s north-west.

There is doubt over the direct involvement of Boko Haram in the latest mass abduction, however. Shekau’s statement lacked detail, and officials in Katsina have already received ransom demands from a group of bandits that witnesses said were responsible.

One western official working in counter-terrorism in the region said it was possible bandits may have transferred some or all of the kidnapped schoolboys to the extremists in return for money, weapons or other resources.

Across the entire Sahel region, there are close relations between armed criminals, traffickers and Islamist extremists.

More details have emerged of Friday’s attack. Musa Adamu, 18, was sleeping in the school’s dormitory when he heard gunshots.

“The sound got louder, then I ran and jumped out of the window and over the fence of the school and ran along with many others into the forest. We spent the night there, because we were afraid to come back to the school,” he said.

Another student was unable to flee the initial attack and was robbed.

“Two of the gunmen broke into our hostel and asked us to give them our phones. I told them I had no phone, then they collected our money, then broke open our lockers and took our soaps, skin creams, milk and biscuits,” said Hassan Al Bashir.

“The gunmen then started shouting that we should all go outside, but as we were going I sneaked and hid and that was how I escaped them.’’

Samatu Aliyu was forced to march into the forest by the attackers with hundreds of others, but managed to escape and found his way back to Kankara after 36 hours.

“We walked from that night to the morning in the forest without shoes. Most of us had feet that were bleeding and there was nothing to eat. We only drank muddy water, and at some point, they left me behind and turned away, and so I ran and walked back alone,” Aliyu said.

The attack has sparked anger in the largely poor and rural region.

Nigeria’s president, Muhammadu Buhari, who is from Katsina, condemned the “cowardly … attack on innocent children”.

Jamilu Isah, a resident of Kankara, said the town was “in mourning”.

“Our mothers are still crying everywhere you go in the town. People are not happy. We feel the government has abandoned us … we just want them to bring our boys back,” he said.

Kidnappings for ransom by bandits have become commonplace across much of the north-west in recent years, with frequent ambushes on roads, as well as fatal robberies targeting cattle and food.

Towns close to forests stretching across north-west Nigeria and into Niger have been the most vulnerable to attacks.

According to Amnesty International, 1,126 people were killed by bandits in Nigeria between January and June this year.

While “banditry” encompasses a range of criminal activity, many of the recent large-scale armed attacks are suspected to have been carried out by assailants from the semi-nomadic Fulani community.

The attack in Katsina will put further pressure on Buhari and his government, which have failed to address the endemic insecurity in much of Nigeria.

Successive military efforts have failed to destroy Boko Haram and Shekau has been reported dead on multiple occasions.

“The Buhari administration has not responded to this situation with the urgency, seriousness and tact it requires. Different military operations have been launched, but it’s clear that all of them are understaffed, under-skilled and underfunded,” Bulama Bukarti, an extremism expert and analyst at the Tony Blair Institute, said.
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antineoETC
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Re: Nigeria

Post by antineoETC »

Ariel. You know that Christianity in Africa, being a product of British colonialism, has no right to be there anyway - unlike Islam, which is the true religion of the black man.
"Prophet Muhammad...bought, sold, captured, and owned slaves" SOURCE: BBC website
"Muhammad is considered to be a perfect model" SOURCE: BBC website
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Ariel
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Re: Nigeria

Post by Ariel »

antineoETC wrote:
Fri Dec 25, 2020 8:21 am
Ariel. You know that Christianity in Africa, being a product of British colonialism, has no right to be there anyway - unlike Islam, which is the true religion of the black man.
I know, and we must give great respect to Muslims , who are the best nation produced [as an example] for mankind. So, they have every right to rape, kidnap, or kill the unbelievers.

But I have good nieuws . The 344 kidnapped Nigerian boys have been freed, state official says. If they lie, I lie.
344 kidnapped Nigerian boys freed, says state official

Hundreds of schoolboys who were abducted last week in northwestern Nigeria have been freed, according to a state official.

More than 300 schoolboys were missing for nearly a week, after an attack on the Government Science Secondary School Kankara in Katsina State. The Nigerian military late on Thursday rescued 344 of them, and they have been received at the state capital by governor Aminu Bello Masari, according to his spokesperson, Abdu Labaran.

Boko Haram was not involved, he added, but rather the boys were kidnapped by bandits masquerading as the Islamist terrorist group.

CNN has not been able to independently verify this.

Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari greeted the news in a statement posted to Twitter, saying: "This is a huge relief to the entire country & international community."

Buhari also asked citizens to be "patient and fair" to the government amid fierce criticism of the country's persistent security issues.

"Our administration is fully aware of the responsibility we have to protect the lives and property of all Nigerians. I ask Nigerians to be patient and fair to us as we deal with the challenges of security, the economy, and corruption. We will not relent," he wrote.

Some of the abducted children had addressed the Nigerian government in a video released earlier on Thursday, which bore the logo of Boko Haram.

In the video, a boy in a white shirt appears to be coaxed by someone off camera into making the demands on behalf of the captors. He asks the Nigerian government to close down schools that teach "western education" and says government troops sent to find the boys should retreat.

The video shows dozens of children under a tree, who appear tired. The voice in the video claims to be Abubakar Shekau, a leader of one of Boko Haram's factions.

Masari confirmed to CNN on Thursday that the children in the video are some of the pupils who were kidnapped. However he disputed the voice claiming to be Shekau, and said instead that "local bandits" were "mimicking" his speech.

Earlier in the week, a man claiming to be Shekau had said the group was responsible for the kidnapping in a short audio message shared with Nigerian media and reviewed by CNN.

When speaking with CNN's Becky Anderson on Wednesday, Masari did not dismiss the message entirely but cautioned that "more concrete evidence" was needed before it could be confirmed that Boko Haram was involved.

While kidnapping for ransom by criminal elements in Katsina state have seen a disturbing increase, an abduction of this scale is unheard of. It recalls the brutal kidnapping of 276 girls from Chibok in 2014 by Shekau's faction. More than 100 of those girls never returned home.

In 2018, a breakaway faction of Boko Haram known as ISWAP kidnapped more than 100 girls in Dapchi. All but one was released weeks later, after negotiations.

Obiageli Ezekwesili, a co-founder of the #BringBackOurGirls movement and former education minister in Nigeria, said she was "surprised" the government had allowed another such kidnapping to occur.

"For me, whatever it is that happened on the ground, is a testimony to the fact that governance is ineffectual," Ezekwesili told CNN's Connect the World on Tuesday.
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Ariel
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Re: Nigeria

Post by Ariel »

Nigeria: Muslims murder at least 11 Christians, burn a church, and seize a priest on Christmas Eve

There are jihad massacres in Nigeria on nearly a daily basis. The global indifference continues.

“Christmas Eve Nigeria attack: 11 dead after Boko Haram militants target Christians,” NZ Herald, December 25, 2020:

Boko Haram jihadists killed at least 11 people, burnt a church and seized a priest on Christmas Eve in Nigeria’s restive northeast, local sources claimed today….

Fighters in trucks and motorcycles stormed Pemi, a predominantly Christian village in Borno state on Thursday, shooting “indiscriminately” and setting buildings on fire, said Abwaku Kabu, a militia leader, quoted by AFP and the Mail.

“The terrorists killed seven people, burnt 10 homes and looted food supplies that were meant to be distributed to residents to celebrate Christmas,” Kabu said.

“Four more dead bodies have been found in the nearby bushes by search and rescue volunteers,” local community leader Ayuba Alamson said on Friday. “This has moved the death toll to 11.”

The number of dead is expected to rise as villagers fled and people are unaccounted for….
The heart of the wise inclines to the right,
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