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Origins of Islam: critical scholarship

PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2015 7:56 am
by Ibn Rushd
In the customer review section of When Christians first met Muslims, buyer A. J. Deus posts a fine review with the many flaws in the consensus scholarship represented in the readings. His website is here: ajdeus.org. Worth reading are his 2 articles about the Umayyads.

Go to the headings on the top until Publications, then hover your mouse over that for the drop-down menu, then hover over Working Papers, and the 2 are there, and free for downloading.

Re: Origins of Islam: critical scholarship

PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2015 7:40 am
by Ibn Rushd
Pretty much anything by Ibn Warraq is going to be extremely helpful. If you go by how riled up academics get, then it's a winner.

Pre-Nicene New Testament

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This is one of the best books on the subject matter. He includes 54 texts including the 27 of the NT (27x2=54) and others including from Nag Hammadi, Qumran, and some other texts known from elsewhere. Extensive introductions accompany each text, along with footnotes. All Greek texts have been freshly translated. He has grouped the texts thematically to their subject matter, which gives new insight into textual families that are not obvious given the ordering of the NT (esp. in the letters of Paul). He has many interesting things to say about "Muhammad" and his similarities to Paul and the Paraclete, angelology, and the Perfect Man from Ebionite theology (which Islam seems to have taken over!). The long intro to the book and the bibliographic essay offer many more insights.

Amazing Colossal Apostle

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Another fantastic book by Price. He examines the structure of published "epistles" in the Roman era, which includes the NT. Also the theological basis for 7 is discussed (7 letters to churches initially, but expanded to become 7 churches, then 7x2=14 letters in total, some with no church recipient in mind). The practice of compiling longest to shortest may lie behind the arrangement of the Qur'an. Some more discussion of Islam.

Quranic Studies

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The original 1977 classic by John Wansbrough, with a new intro and biblio. by Andrew Rippin. Tough slog, and the average reader may not get anything out of it.

Sectarian Milieu

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Seems to be out of print on Amazon, but still available from the publisher. Intro'd by Gerald Hawting.

Death of a Prophet

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Stephen Shoemaker usually writes on Marian theology and Maximus the Confessor, but this is his 2nd foray into Islamic studies. This book has 4 chapters, 1 dealing with a discussion of all the 7th century sources that pertain to Muhammad, and a chapter detailing the rise (more like a bump on the road) and colossal fall of critical scholarship on Islam starting in the 19th century. If you want the scoop on that, this is sure to impress. Now in paperback, so much more affordable. Well worth a read.

The Qur'an and its Biblical Subtext

The cover is the same as all other Routledge blues. This is also a ground breaker, but seems to be more expensive in paperback than Shoemaker's. Reynolds examines 13-14 Islamic tales in the Qur'an, their early interpretations by tafsirists, and the biblical background. Gems include: shakedown of Karen Armstrong (makes you wonder why unis and profs love her so much when she is so terribly wrong), the failure of Western studies to apply critical methods perfected and used in other disciplines (eg. Bible, history, archaeology), and a solution to the "sister of Aaron" conundrum. Well worth it to read!

Also check out the 2 volumes of The Qur'an in its Historical Context which are the proceedings of 2 conferences. The second of these contains the last paper by Nasr Abu Zayd who died suddenly soon after this. The first volume has many gems, including an indepth discussion of huris, and Syriac Christianity and language.




That's all for today. I will have more information later, but it is getting late.

Re: Origins of Islam: critical scholarship

PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2015 4:42 pm
by Fernando
Ibn Rushd wrote:In the customer review section of When Christians first met Muslims, buyer A. J. Deus posts a fine review with the many flaws in the consensus scholarship represented in the readings. His website is here: ajdeus.org. Worth reading are his 2 articles about the Umayyads.

Go to the headings on the top until Publications, then hover your mouse over that for the drop-down menu, then hover over Working Papers, and the 2 are there, and free for downloading.
Some interesting stuff here. What a pity Deus's own articles aren't written with the clarity and digestibility that he credits Penn's work with! I fear even the text of his pdfs could be sharper. I shall have to read them in very small doses - clearly the idea that the Umayyads converted to Islam, rather than merely being less than devout Muslims, is an important one well worth developing.

Re: Origins of Islam: critical scholarship

PostPosted: Sat Jan 02, 2016 6:21 am
by Ibn Rushd
Iqsa

Internation Qur'anic Studies Association

See the titles and authors presented at the annual conference, and check out their blog. Unfortunately most resources are for members only. :( How can the public share in the discoveries if it's kept out of sight? How can the public determine if their university funding is being put to good use?

Mizan project

I received this in an email from Gabriel Said Reynolds, I haven't had time to look through yet, but he's a pretty good scholar. His writings are found in some academic journals, as well as Catholic magazines such as First Things, and Commonweal. His writings express an impatience with pro-Islamic apologists among academics, and shows deeper knowledge than most.

Re: Origins of Islam: critical scholarship

PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2016 6:33 pm
by Ibn Rushd
Martin Kramer Reader

All of Martin Kramer's published works, including his recent contributions to Mosaic magazine, a jewish bi-monthly.

In 2001, you will find his hugely important Ivory Towers on Sand. Download the book and be amazed at the history of Middle Eastern scholarship.

Re: Origins of Islam: critical scholarship

PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2017 6:16 pm
by Fernando
http://inarah.net/links keeps on giving! Browsing from there led me to this:
https://archive.org/stream/Hagarism/Hagarism%3B%20The%20Making%20of%20the%20Islamic%20World-Crone%2C%20Cook#page/n23/mode/2up
A complete copy of Patricia Crone & Michael Cook's Hagarism; The Making of the Islamic World.
Although it looks like a scanned pdf, it can be downloaded as both that and in .epub and .txt formats. The latter is formatted for MS Word (it's terrible in Notepad and not good in Wordpad).
Enjoy!
EDIT
archive.org also has three books by John Wansbrough
https://archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%28john%20wansbrough%29%20AND%20mediatype%3A%28texts%29
an three by Ibn Warraq
https://archive.org/search.php?query=creator%3A%28ibn%20warraq%29
And finally...for now...
The Syro-Aramaic Reading of the Koran
by Christoph Luxenberg
https://archive.org/details/ChristophLuxenberg

Re: Origins of Islam: critical scholarship

PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:00 am
by Ibn Rushd
I already have those books by Ibn Warraq. So glad to see more of this becoming more available.