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Giving up the g/i/n/ jinn

PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:48 am
by Fernando
"I treat unexplained illnesses that doctors cannot explain or cure such as period or menstrual issues or excessive behaviours such as gambling, drugs or alcohol.
How does he achieve this abstinence?
The ceremony was one of thousands carried out every year in the UK where imams rid men and women of evil spirits or "jinn" which they believe live inside them.
Read all about it.
WATCH: Islamic exorcism revealed for first time in shocking video
https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/913718/WATCH-Islamic-exorcism-revealed-for-first-time-in-shocking-video

Re: Giving up the g/i/n/ jinn

PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:23 pm
by manfred
Perhaps it is worth mentioning, specially for SAM and his interest in "paganism", that stories about the jinn in Arabia (and also parts of Africa) are much older than Islam. They started off as more or less equivalent to "gods", the main difference being that "gods" were mostly benevolent and the jinn mischievous or even evil. The original jinn, however, are probably Roman... a "genius" is a spirit each human is born with, who guides his/her thoughts and actions. Some of these "genii" are good some are evil. The Arab cousins, they are mostly invisible and can change shape into animals. However the pre-Islamic jinn are mostly evil, they live in any dead or desolate place, but there is also a story of them living in a "city" inside a mountain called Kaf, which underneath has a huge emerald.

They started off as living in pretty much any dead thing or desolate place, but in time we had stories of some jinn "possessing" people, causing mental illness.

All this has been pretty much preserved in Islam, as your article shows.

Fascinating, isn't it, SAM?

There are also references to magic practices, notably a mysterious process of 'blowing on knots'( 113.4). A defence against magic was to 'take refuge with (adha) some superior power. The last two suras of the Qur'an are formulas of 'taking refuge' against certain specified evils, and are known as the Mu'awwidbatayn. They are used like magic spells. In these two suras and elsewhere Muslims are encouraged to 'take refuge with God' both from Satan (7-200; 16.98; 41.36) and from men (40-56; etc.); pagans are criticized for 'taking refuge' with jinn (72.6). All this shows something of the variety of religious practice in Arabia the Arabia of 600 AD, and the once upon a time equivalence of deities such as Allah and jinn. (Muhammad's Mecca, W. Montgomery Watt, Chapter 3: Religion In Pre-Islamic, p26-45)

Re: Giving up the g/i/n/ jinn

PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:11 am
by Hombre
SAM it is your turn. Go ahead and educate the infidels. :lighten:

Re: Giving up the g/i/n/ jinn

PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 2:16 am
by Hombre
manfred wrote:Perhaps it is worth mentioning, specially for SAM and his interest in "paganism", that stories about the jinn in Arabia (and also parts of Africa) are much older than Islam. They stared off as more or less equivalent to "gods", the main difference being that "gods" were mostly benevolent and the jinn mischievous or even evil. The original jinn, however, are probably Roman... a "genius" is a spirit each human is born with, who guides his/her thoughts and actions. Some of these "genii" are good some are evil. The Arab cousins, they are mostly invisible and can change shape into animals. However the pre-Islamic jinn are mostly evil, they live in any dead or desolate place, but there is also a story of them living in a "city" inside a mountain called Kaf, which underneath has a huge emerald.

They started off as living in pretty much any dead thing or desolate place, but in time we had stories of some jinn "possessing" people, causing mental illness.

All this has been pretty much preserved in Islam, as your article shows.

Fascinating, isn't it, SAM?

There are also references to magic practices, notably a mysterious process of 'blowing on knots'( 113.4). A defence against magic was to 'take refuge with (adha) some superior power. The last two suras of the Qur'an are formulas of 'taking refuge' against certain specified evils, and are known as the Mu'awwidbatayn. They are used like magic spells. In these two suras and elsewhere Muslims are encouraged to 'take refuge with God' both from Satan (7-200; 16.98; 41.36) and from men (40-56; etc.); pagans are criticized for 'taking refuge' with jinn (72.6). All this shows something of the variety of religious practice in Arabia the Arabia of 600 AD, and the once upon a time equivalence of deities such as Allah and jinn. (Muhammad's Mecca, W. Montgomery Watt, Chapter 3: Religion In Pre-Islamic, p26-45)
As a none-Muslim, I really admire your deep knowledge of Islam and well as other religion. I truly enjoy your writing - always learn something new. Thanks manfred.

Re: Giving up the g/i/n/ jinn

PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 12:20 pm
by Fernando
Hombre wrote:As a none-Muslim, I really admire your deep knowledge of Islam and well as other religion. I truly enjoy your writing - always learn something new. Thanks manfred.
Well said, Hombre: thanks indeed Manfred.
Oh, and SAM - be careful not to go rubbing any old oil lamps. :whistling: