Hijab.

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sum
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Hijab.

Post by sum »

I was talking to a teacher who told me that the muslim girls in that school who were passed puberty would wear the hijab but take it off when having a period. This surprised me. Is this the norm or just peculiar to the area in which the school was situated?

sum

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Fernando
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Re: Hijab.

Post by Fernando »

sum wrote:I was talking to a teacher who told me that the muslim girls in that school who were passed puberty would wear the hijab but take it off when having a period. This surprised me. Is this the norm or just peculiar to the area in which the school was situated?

sum
Well, since the scarf is worn to conceal the hair, and that because the hair is supposed to contain the female "semen", perhaps that semen is supposed to depart via the menses and so the empty hair need not be covered? It would almost make sense!
‘Hindus and Muslims belong to two different religious philosophies, social customs and literary traditions. They neither intermarry nor eat together, and indeed they belong to two different civilisations which are based mainly on conflicting ideas and conceptions.’ Muhammad Ali Jinnah

Nosuperstition
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Re: Hijab.

Post by Nosuperstition »

According to what I have been told,in the National Geographic channel they mentioned that the more the thick hair,the more will be the productivity of that woman and men will be more attracted towards them.Hence muslim women are required to cover up their hair.Perhaps it is a correlation linked to the fact that such a woman is genetically well receptive to nourishment and hence has a better ability to deliver many more babies.Now for me that appears as Eugenics or natural selection whichever way you are able to see it.
palli or halli in Dravidian languages means a village just like gaav in Aryan languages means a village.palli or halli in Aryan Mauryan Imperial era around 200 B.C designates a tribal hamlet.So many of those in South India are indeed descendants of tribals and are still keeping up that heritage.

Nosuperstition
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Re: Hijab.

Post by Nosuperstition »

Fernando wrote:
sum wrote:I was talking to a teacher who told me that the muslim girls in that school who were passed puberty would wear the hijab but take it off when having a period. This surprised me. Is this the norm or just peculiar to the area in which the school was situated?

sum
Well, since the scarf is worn to conceal the hair, and that because the hair is supposed to contain the female "semen", perhaps that semen is supposed to depart via the menses and so the empty hair need not be covered? It would almost make sense!
Well even Hindu women are barred from participating in religious rituals during menstruation.Since wearing hijab is a holy religious duty of a muslim woman,they too perhaps shouldn't perform that holy duty while being unclean during menstruation.Or may be since women happen to be unclean during that period and as men might not love sexual attractions in such periods,they are exempt from that duty.
palli or halli in Dravidian languages means a village just like gaav in Aryan languages means a village.palli or halli in Aryan Mauryan Imperial era around 200 B.C designates a tribal hamlet.So many of those in South India are indeed descendants of tribals and are still keeping up that heritage.

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manfred
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Re: Hijab.

Post by manfred »

NS read the question and respond if you can answer it. Does a MUSLIM woman normally (or in some countries/cultural settings) remove her hijab when having her period? If yes, why?

I never head this before, so I cannot comment, except to say it is a very specific question completely unrelated to anything Hindu.

I know it is very hard for you to do, but try to at least occasionally write a post without Hindu stuff.
Jesus: "Ask and you will receive." Mohammed: "Take and give me 20%"

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Ariel
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Re: Hijab.

Post by Ariel »

UK Muslima: “I stopped wearing my hijab because I was scared for my life”

The UK’s Metro on Thursday published a sob story entitled “I stopped wearing my hijab because I was scared for my life,” all about “Islamophobia” in the Sceptered Isle. Sumaiya Ahmed, who poses, hijabless but demure, in a photo accompanying the article, complains: “You’d think growing up in a predominantly Asian area in London would mean not having to deal with racism and Islamophobia. But as a British-Bangladeshi Muslim, I can say racism in this city runs deep.”

Racism? What race is Islam again? What race is wearing the hijab? In any case, this article proceeds from the assumption that women who wear hijabs in the UK (and the US) are routinely subjected to discrimination and harassment, and that Britons (and Americans) consequently need this reminder that decent folk treat hijabis with respect. Hijabis should indeed be treated with respect, like everyone else, but it is false that they are routinely disrespected in this country.

In fact, many of the most celebrated of the cases claiming this turned out to have been faked by the victims themselves. In one such incident, an eleven-year-old girl in Toronto made international headlines with her claim that a man had followed her and cut her hijab with scissors. After an investigation, police concluded that the attack never happened.

Likewise, Yasmin Seweid, a Muslim teen who claimed in December 2016 that Trump supporters on a New York subway tore off her hijab and no one in the packed subway car helped her. She, too, gained international media attention, and she, too, made up the whole thing.

Shortly before that, a hijab-wearing Muslim student at San Diego State University also falsely claimed that she was assaulted by Trump supporters.

In July 2017, a Muslim in Britain falsely claimed that a man had pulled off her hijab in a “race hate attack.” In November 2016, a University of Michigan Muslim student claimed she was “accosted by a white man who told her to remove her hijab or he would set her ablaze with a cigarette lighter.” She also fabricated the whole event. And there are many others of this kind.

The hijab symbolizes the subjugation of women in Islam. Women are required to wear the hijab according to Islamic law because it is their responsibility to remove temptation from men. If men are tempted anyway and they end up being sexually assaulted or raped, it’s their fault.

Because the hijab is an important part of a woman’s responsibility under Sharia, many women have been brutalized and even killed for not wearing it.

Aqsa Parvez’s Muslim father choked her to death with her hijab after she refused to wear it. Amina Muse Ali was a Christian woman in Somalia whom Muslims murdered because she wasn’t wearing a hijab.

40 women were murdered in Iraq in 2007 for not wearing the hijab.

Alya Al-Safar’s Muslim cousin threatened to kill her and harm her family because she stopped wearing the hijab in Britain.

Amira Osman Hamid faced whipping in Sudan for refusing to wear the hijab.

An Egyptian girl, also named Amira, committed suicide after being brutalized by her family for refusing to wear the hijab.

Muslim and non-Muslim teachers at the Islamic College of South Australia were told they had to wear the hijab or be fired.

Women in Chechnya were police shot with paintballs because they weren’t wearing hijab. Other women in Chechnya were threatened by men with automatic rifles for not wearing hijab.

Elementary school teachers in Tunisia were threatened with death for not wearing hijab.

Syrian schoolgirls were forbidden to go to school unless they wore hijab.

Women in Gaza were forced by Hamas to wear hijab.

Women in London were threatened with murder by Muslim thugs if they didn’t wear hijab.

An anonymous young Muslim woman doffed her hijab outside her home and started living a double life in fear of her parents.

Fifteen girls in Saudi Arabia were killed when the religious police wouldn’t let them leave their burning school building because they had taken off their hijabs in their all-female environment.

A girl in Italy had her head shaved by her mother for not wearing hijab.

Other women and girls have been killed or threatened, or live in fear for daring not to wear the hijab.

Women in Iran continue to protest against the Islamic regime by daring to take off their hijabs, despite the fact that they face heavy prison sentences for doing so.

But where is the weepy article in the UK’s Metro about the many victims of hijab? Who is standing with them?
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but the heart of the fool to the left.

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Ariel
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Re: Hijab.

Post by Ariel »

And here is the sob story of the scared muslima.

But first her picture. Without hijab.
Image

With hijab. I always thought muslima's have to wear the hijab to be modest , so that men will not gaze at her.

Image
You’d think growing up in a predominantly Asian area in London would mean not having to deal with racism and Islamophobia.

But as a British-Bangladeshi Muslim, I can say racism in this city runs deep.

The mark it leaves behind lasts forever and can even drastically change the way you live your life.

When I was 10 years old, my cousin and I were called ‘P***s’ by two white boys and a man outside a block of flats as we were on our way to Tesco. At this age, neither of us knew the awful connotations of the word; we just knew it was bad.

When I was 11 years old, I started wearing the hijab in public, and the following year, while on my way home from the mosque, an older white man called me a ‘terrorist’.

I remember feeling my heart pound in my chest and my mouth go dry. I sped up and walked faster to get away in case he decided to turn around and use more Islamophobic abuse. I was fully covered – dressed in a hijab and abaya – with the Quran held in my arms since the mosque I went to was pretty local.

I clutched the Quran closer to me, seeking comfort in the words from God. The fear I felt at the thought of it escalating was debilitating. I practically sprinted the rest of the way home, rushed through the front door and instantly told my parents what happened. ‘I was called a terrorist,’ I said to them. Neither of them spoke English, but they knew the meaning of the word and they knew what it meant when used to abuse Muslims. They didn’t quite know what to say. They couldn’t tell me to take my hijab off, or to not go to the mosque. These were the basic foundations of Islam and my religion was heavily part of my identity. I loved wearing my hijab

Being called a terrorist in a place I grew up and considered home made me feel alienated. Every time I left the mosque, I would walk as quickly as I could and never made eye contact with anyone to avoid getting unwanted attention. I hated feeling as if my identity was a beacon of hate and it even made me question whether I really wanted to wear it or not. Maybe it would be easier to take it off. I didn’t though.

I decided against it because the hijab was a symbol of my faith, my identity, and I didn’t know how to be without the hijab. As time wore on, I began to put this fear of wearing the hijab aside. This was just one white man who verbally abused me. I could get over it. I loved wearing my hijab. I felt comfortable in it and it became a part of the person I was.

For years, the hijab meant the world to me. I even remember, in year four or five, crying one day when we unexpectedly stayed with my aunt for a few days and I forgot to pack scarves to wear to school. My aunt lent me one of her triangular scarves that I found super hard to fold, but at least I had a hijab on.

And then it happened again when I was 18 years old. As I was leaving the train station, a man called me a ‘terrorist’, but this time I was going to do something about it. I yelled back, ‘Speak up if you have something to say’ but he didn’t and just kept walking on.

It wasn’t until the Westminster attack that I started to truly feel that perhaps wearing a visible marker of my faith was making me feel unsafe. Following the attack, my parents told me to wear a hoodie over my hijab to try and hide the fact I wore it. I also saw stories flooding social media about anxiety from Muslim women fearing getting pushed into the train tracks and facing an onslaught of Islamophobic abuse – a feeling I found myself echoing. I’d stand as far back as I could from the yellow line to practically press myself against the wall, always keeping an eye out for everyone who walked past or stood near me.

This fear was a part of what ultimately led to me taking my hijab off. My decision to stop wearing my headscarf wasn’t easy but I felt like I had no choice.

The first few days and weeks without the hijab felt weird There was an increase in Islamophobia after the terror attacks, not to mention our current prime minister’s previous comments about women in niqab and burkas looking like ‘letterboxes’ and ‘bank robbers’.

At the time, I also felt personal struggles in my faith. I was questioning Islam and the rules I had to adhere to as a Muslim. I wholeheartedly love my religion, but I found aspects of it sexist and misogynistic – like how women weren’t allowed to travel without a mahram (a male member of the family with whom marriage is forbidden) or marry a non-Muslim man, whereas Muslim men can marry non-Muslim women.

After I took my hijab off for the first time in 2016, the Islamophobic comments and stares stopped. I found myself feeling safer from Islamophobic attacks without it, but still fearing racist abuse.

The first few days and weeks without the hijab felt weird, but also strangely nice – I enjoyed feeling the wind in my hair. It felt like another part of me had woken up from a long slumber. But I wish it didn’t have to come to me taking my hijab off to feel safe.

I’ve gotten so used to not wearing it all the time now, that I feel more comfortable, and out of harm’s way, without it.

The thing is though, I felt too weird to ever actually come out and tell my family ‘I don’t wear the hijab all the time’ – it felt like a sign of weakness and lack of faith, as if I was letting the fear win.

I’m sure they suspect I no longer wear it everywhere I go, but nobody’s ever really said anything. I do still wear it sometimes because I don’t think I can ever commit to fully taking it off. At family events, weddings and parties, I have the hijab on, and sometimes when I go out shopping. I have a bit of an on-and-off relationship with the hijab. It is still a part of my identity as a British-Bangladeshi Muslim woman. I truly hope I can go back to wearing it and feel safe, and comfortable, when I do, instead of being petrified of what could happen and fearing the worst.

But I will never truly feel safe until we as a society recognise and challenge Islamophobia whenever it happens.

This starts at the very top with Boris Johnson. He’s since apologised for ‘any offence’ that he caused with his ‘letterbox’ and ‘bank robbers’ comments but he can’t go back and change the fact that there was a ‘significant spike’ in anti-Muslim hate crimes after he made the ‘letterbox’ comment, according to charity Tell MAMA – a charity supporting victims of Islamophobia. He still hasn’t properly acknowledge the dangers of this comparison.

At the end of the day, we’re British citizens and should be able to feel safe in our own country – whether that be on train station platforms or while walking home.
The heart of the wise inclines to the right,
but the heart of the fool to the left.

sum
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Re: Hijab.

Post by sum »

Her Quote -

But as a British-Bangladeshi Muslim, I can say racism in this city runs deep.

She should be asked if "racism" runs deep in Bangladesh and Pakistan.

She should also be asked if girls should or should not be killed by family for not wearing the hijab.

She should also be asked if she agrees with Muhammad who said that there will be no punishment for the killing of your children or grandchildren.

sum

antineoETC
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Re: Hijab.

Post by antineoETC »

Ariel wrote:With hijab. I always thought muslima's have to wear the hijab to be modest , so that men will not gaze at her.
Actually, she is more alluring with the headscarf framing her face than without. No heterosexual man is going to see her face and not be struck by her beauty. Indeed, the only way she can prevent this is to cover her face completely.
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Re: Hijab.

Post by iffo »

I have never heard that hijab and menses have any link.

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Centaur
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Re: Hijab.

Post by Centaur »

But I will never truly feel safe until we as a society recognise and challenge Islamophobia whenever it happens.
Islamophobia is an oxymoron. This should be called Muslim phobia not Islamophobia.

Muslim phobia would stop when those Muslims involved in terrorism stop beheading and stop blowing up people following the teachings of their perfect example forever - a 7th century rapist, child molester and mass murderer- Mohamed.


Dont think any of these will stop racism/bullying etc though.
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